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i have an opportunity to buy a zx6r front end wheels rotors, and some other accessories for 400 bucks. would this be a pretty easy swap(relatively speaking) what all should i be looking for? what year parts should i be looking for, and what would i still need to complete the swap.

Also ive been searching for a thread detailing the swap and have found its possible and after pictures but no step by step? anyone have a link to a thread like that?
 

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GO FOR IT!!!

Coming from someone who had the swap themselves, the handling aspects of the 636/zx6R front end on the Ninja 650R are UNREAL! Definately worth the money. You'll need the forks, axle, wheel, rotors, calipers, top and bottom tripples, master cylinder, and clip-ons. I used everything off of a 2005/6 model for my swap.
 

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Use 03-04 triple clamps. A little secret I haven't seen written is that the 09 ZX6 front end will also bolt right up too. I know of one bike running the BPF front end :) You have to use the entire 09 front end, no mixing and matching. If you use 03-04 triples, you can use forks / wheel / brakes from 03-06. Maybe 07-08. I forget on those.
 

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I love mine. The triple needs to be '03-'04 as was mentioned, the steering stem on the '05 and newer is too thick. I have '04 lower triple & stem, '04 tubes, '05 forward sets, Calipers and rotors. The top triple I got is from Speigler, with handlebar risers. Handles much better than the stock turn of the century tech forks, and the adjustability is sweet :)
 

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I love mine. The triple needs to be '03-'04 as was mentioned, the steering stem on the '05 and newer is too thick. I have '04 lower triple & stem, '04 tubes, '05 forward sets, Calipers and rotors. The top triple I got is from Speigler, with handlebar risers. Handles much better than the stock turn of the century tech forks, and the adjustability is sweet :)
You should definitely post some pictures
 

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You should definitely post some pictures
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157624631775619/

Photos! Most are not so great quality, but some are okay. The set is basically a dump of all the photos I've taken of the bike since we started the build in April '09 up until today.

Bear in mind, my bike is a work in progress... still... :) Need some grips and shorty levers now that I look at the close up of the bars, kind of grisly looking! I could go on forever about the "to do" list for the bike. Just finished wiring up 5 LED strips in my trunk, next up is a throttle lock... wet sand front fender, find plug for steering stem, wire 12v charging socket / USB, etc.

Back to the front end conversion.

It blew my mind that the 636 clutch lever was non adjustable. You would think since the 650r has that, their SS bike would? But no... I also need to construct a more attractive front brake fluid reservoir bracket, and the reservoir itself is getting a little bleached; does anyone know of an alternative that is a bit more aesthetically pleasing than the stock reservoir? I suppose I could use most any air tight container that was of an appropriate volume. What is the function of the rubber membrane / diaphragm in the cap? That may be a rub.

And yes, I have one '05 rotor and one '04 rotor at the moment. One of my '05 rotors has a slight bend, having it straightened in an attempt to avoid $150 for a new one. Looks a bit odd, but stops just fine.
 

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i really would love to do this, if i can find a whole set up wheel and all im doing it.

Might be hard to find the whole shebang at one time. Piecing it together is not so bad, just make sure you have a detailed list of what parts you need & their respective years. It is also of major importance to get unbent forks, wheel & rotors. Just make sure you don't close your rotor in the damn clamp on a bike lift. Dammit. :mad:
 

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a side question:

how do you go about deciding how far up or down the forks to mount the tiple tree? I guess what i am asking is do you have to mount them at the "stock height" (like this guys pictures show) or can you lower the front end a little things like that. Does that screw up the handling geometry?
 

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You don't have to mount them at "stock" height, and yes it does have an effect on rake angle and subsequently, trail. Steeper angles (caused by lowering) usually make the bike react to steering input quicker. This can be taken too far, to the point the machine is unstable and unsteady. If you are lowering the rear at the same time, you can restore factory rake and have affect your handling very little.

When I first put my machine on the road, the ride height adjustment on the rear shock was slammed all the way down; I found the bike to be disturbingly sluggish, until I raised the rear end of the machine.

Adjusting fork height is primarily a personal preference thing, reaching efficiency between handling and ride height.

650r stock Rake (fork angle): 25.0°. Trail: 107 mm (4.2 inches)
'05 636 Caster (rake angle), 25°. Trail, 106 mm (4.2 in.)

My '07 650, after some rough measurements, showed a rake angle of approx. 21°. And by rough, I mean my SSS measurements were 16" (hypotenuse), 14.75 (vert.) and 5.5. Which got me a right angle of ~92°, so it's obviously off, but close enough for gov't work. This means that I've gone 4° closer to vertical than stock for either bikes, which you can accomplish by lowering the forks I think; dunno how pronounced the change is.

I guess to answer the questions, you decide how far up or down by the handling and ride height of the bike; and if taken too far, it can negatively impact handling.
 
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