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It does not make sense.

First, I'd start by either inspecting, checking adjustment, and lubricating the clutch cable, (until comes out the other end), or changing it altogether.

If that does not do it, I'd inspect the inside of the wet clutch, which in a motorcycle with a transversal engine, is a breeze. Easy, very easy. Changing the cable is actually the most difficult part.

On shifting. The clutch is not necessary for shifting and does not prevent shifting, even if engaged. You can shift by simply closing the throttle. Some riders don't use the clutch, except for taking off. Not recomended though. The clutch is more like a safety device from ever shifting w/out closing the throttle. The so called 'quick shifter' they sell, is basically a fuel injector interrupter when detecting a jab on the shifter. All that without disengaging the clutch.
 

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Yes, but first, first, ..start with the easiest. They have this tool to seal and spray lubricant inside the cable on one end, until comes out the other end. To do this properly you have to disconnect the cable any way. . Of course inspect visually what you can, like fraying. Once disconnected you can slide the cable in the sleeve see if it moves freely. Also check on the leve that is also free.

.....don't know how well you know a wet multiplate clutch inside, but there is only a pack of discs, metal and friction, pressed together by the springs. When you depress the clutch lever, you are pulling on these springs. ...and if no (significant) friction on the cable or lever...that should only be the force you are up against. There is also a stem inside the clutch cover, and that usually connectsto the clutch center pin by a pawl, or ratchet mechanism.

..........................but overall it is very, very simple, and unless something has broken (like a spring)...nothing should be obstructing the action. If you have to open the clutch and see.... it is very easy. Nothing at all like the in-line dry clutches on automobiles, or Guzzies, and BMWs, which requires dropping trasnmission, shaft, and swingarm. This is easy.
 
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