RiderForums.com - Kawasaki Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I apologize if redundant, but searched and did not find a thread on point.

I have never worked on bikes (or cars for that matter) before, but I want to start now, so that I can do my own maintenance. I was curious to know what standard tools you all have in your "bike tool box". What is essential?

thanks,

OrionM
 

·
West Coast Moderator
Joined
·
12,996 Posts
I would go with a set of metric wrenches ranging in size from 6mm to 19mm, a 10 or 12" adjustable wrench, 12mm allen wrench, slip joint pliers, side cutters, needle nose pliers, a light weight and medium weight ball peen (sp?) hammers, a good set of feeler gauges, "vise-grip" pliers, a razor knife, a good set of screw drivers, a cold chisel set, center punch set, "lok-tite", anti-seize, zip ties, flash light, inspection mirror and a magnet with a telescopic handle. With that collection and your stock tool kit, you should be able to tackle just about anything on the bike.

For the buyer on a budget, check out garage sales and swap meets. Harbor Freight has good prices, but the quality isn't always there. Craftsman (Sears) has good quality tools along with Mac and Snap-On, but the tool trucks aren't always handy and Sears has on-line, mail order as well as in store sales and exchanges (guaranteed for life).

A manual or 2 are well worth their weight in gold also
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
3,610 Posts
Let see...everything listed about seems right....But don't forget to add these items everytime you work on the bike. Trust me, you'll probably need them. Otherwise when you do something stupid you'll be thinking "Damn I wish I had ______ right now!"

1.) A Bag Of Ice (Hit your head on the handlebars on the way up, touch a hot exhaust pipe etc.)

2.) Your Manual (To figure out how it goes BACK together)

3.) A Beer (Need I explain?)

4.) Get your wife, or significant other out of the garage, and lock the door if possible.

5.) Keep the rest of the day open, b/c now you'll be trying to fix what you broke when you were trying to fix a problem.

6.) PATIENCE. Lots and Lots of PATIENCE. That's the key here.

7.) Did I mention beer?
 

·
Wants to be "Fade"....
Joined
·
2,600 Posts
First thing you need is a .........torque wrench and mm sockets. You already have your bike toolkit as a beginning. Sooner or later your toolbox will fill up but this can be done in time.......my 1cent
...I lost 1 the other day.:cool:
 

·
Maintenance Overlord
Joined
·
5,609 Posts
tool box

Just a few thoughts,

It is not necessay, to go and buy all the tools at once, firsty there is the initial cost and secondly you can shop around at different suppliers to obtain better and less costly tools at your convenience.

I would suggest, that first up have a look at the bikes tools and purchase quality tools to duplicate these inferior tools.

The next thing I would suggest is to buy the service manual and start doing some of the basic maintenance work such as cleaning the air filter, you then start using the basic tool kit, and as you progress through the jobs you will find that you will have to expand your tool range and then you will be building up your tool kit.

Where practicalble buy quality tools, if you do they will last you a lifetime, whenever I lose or misplace a tool it is like losing a close friend and vice a versa if I find a misplaced tool,my day is made.

I still have some tools I acquired as an apprentice 40 years ago and they have kept me good company, always ready to work and not to be abused.

I hope this gives you some encouragement to work on your bike

Graeme Gould at Byron Bay the most Easterly part of Australia
 

·
The Deer Slayer
Joined
·
7,382 Posts
Sorry to be such a pain in the neck, but could you be more specific with your question ? The Fisher Price tool box, or the Playskool tool box?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,274 Posts
gotta emphasize what martin and stan said, good quality tools and patience.

if you buy cheap tools they'll break and screw up the fasteners on the bike when they do, maybe the paint if they hit it. buy good quality stuff and you never need to buy it again, unless you have a son like my father did who loses things occasionally ;)

patience is your best tool. patience is more important than skill and knowledge. go slow, you'll figure it out. can't figure it out? stop and wait until you find someone who does to ask.

one last note, go to price club or costco or wherever and buy a bag of cleaning towels. these cost about $10 for about 20 one foot square terrycloth towels. these are good for three things:
1) wiping of tools, hands, bike or anything else that gets greasy and dirty.
2) covering anything shiny while you work on the bike. when a tool slips or drops and hits the paint the paint never wins. see also 'patience' mentioned above.
3) they will save you many fights with the family. keep shop clothes and towels separate from the rest of the laundry. wash them separately with lestoil when they're dirty. this still applies if you live alone. it keeps you from ruining your own nice clothes and gets your prepared for when yours aren't the only ones in the machine.

scott :)
 

·
Silver Member
Joined
·
881 Posts
For daily riding :

1) Visa Card

2) Cellphone

3) Autoclub membership

4) Whatever is in that black bag under the seat


:)
 

·
Dirty Harry.... Moderator
Joined
·
9,816 Posts
titomike said:
For daily riding :

1) Visa Card

2) Cellphone

3) Autoclub membership

4) Whatever is in that black bag under the seat


:)
Having no patience, I'm with Mike. But I'm getting better, my tool box is getting heavier -- added torque wrench and larger selection of metric sockets, etc. Tom :D
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top