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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is the first part of the How-to I put together for checking/changing your valve clearances on the Z750S engine. It should be VERY similar for the Z1000 engine.

Note that I had to adjust 7 valves! at 14,000 miles. I had the bike apart for my front end swap anyway - so I decided to check the valves now rather than after the start of the riding season.

Full how-to can be found on Squidbusters.com HERE.

I decided to post this thread separate from all the "Has anyone checked their valves, how many were out?" threads.

Enjoy yourself, I know I did.

I take no responsibility for any omissions I made - you should have the manual to reference during this type of engine work. If you make your engine into a metal grater - don't blame me!

Edit 4-1-08: Added the rest of the original post from SB. If you see any names of members you don't recognize it is because they are members at SB. I mention NatronaZX6R and Eric - they are the same person. I did the same work on his 2006 ZX6R a few weeks before this. Almost exactly the same procedure, except for having to work around his frame.

Edit 2: I was asked to remove Kawasaki Shop Manual pictures. I changed them to links - mods/admins let me know if this is ok, or if they need to be removed altogether.

Edit 12-16-08: Valve Shim Kit Info Added
Review on the Hotcams Refill Kits I purchased

I got two kits.

I purchased the 2.70-to-2.95 mm, and 3.00-to-3.25 mm refill kits. The refill kits progress in 0.05mm increments, meaning I have 12 complete sets. Each refill kit contains 5 shims in each size. The refill kits were $35.95 for 30 shims, so about $1.20 per shim versus the OEM price of $8 per shim.
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Each bike has their own quirks with needing to check the valves... The Z requires you to drain the coolant enough to remove the upper radiator hose to be able to slip the cover back and off.

To drain the coolant the manual says to remove the screw on the left side below the exhaust pipe header on the left side of the engine. I made a quick little funnel out of an Isopropyl Alcohol bottle - it fit perfectly between the coolant hose and header. This was aimed right at the bucket. According to the bucket 2 Liters of coolant came out. No fluid came out until I removed the thermostat housing cap.







I also removed the thermostat housing that sits between the frame tubes at the top of the engine. After that there is PLENTY of clearance for working on the top of the engine. Way easier than working on the ZX6R, and WAY WAY WAY easier than working on the VFR :D.

Attached to the body of the thermostat are two black/yellow striped wires. There is also a wire strap for holding the ignition wiring connector. Remove the bolts securing the wires, etc. from the thermostat housing and move stuff as needed to get it out of the way.





I took the front radiator hose and pulled it out from over the head and let it rest against the outside of the frame. Note that all my hose clamp screws were loose - and I saw a little sign of dried coolant around one hose mating surface - signs of loose hoses and a slight leak.



Next you have to unplug all the connectors on the top of the engine: ignition coils, etc. etc. Then you have to remove the air inject covers, and the vacuum tube that sits between them. The large vacuum tube that comes off the T that goes to both covers attaches to the airbox on the left front. Here is the left air injection valve cover.



After I removed this cover I pull the T off the other cover and folded it back down by the side of the bike so it would be out of the way.

Here you can see the T - there is a small vacuum hose that runs to the front left side of this connector. You will remove the T piece from the other air injector (might be the wrong name) cover and then remove that cover as well.



After you get all the hoses and connectors and wires out of the way you can remove the valve cover.

Pull out all 4 ignition coil sticks.



Unscrew the 6 bolts securing the cover and put them in a safe place. Lift up on the cover, move it towards the back of the engine, so the rear edge of the cover is over the radiator hose connector at the back of the engine. You already removed this hose with the thermostat housing, or at least disconnected it. Once you get the cover in this orientation it just comes out to the left very easily.

 
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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Part deux:

Once the cover is off you have access to the cams. I should mention that I used my air compressor to blow out the dust from around the head and spark plug holes before removing the cover.

After the cover was off I removed the gasket and the spark plugs.





In this shot you can see the white dot of paint they put on at the factory to let you know which mark you will be keeping track of when setting the timing for pistons #1 and #4 for the valve checks.

On the exhaust cam the EX mark gets the white paint, on the intake cam the IN gets the white mark.




The cam caps are marked so that if you take them off, you know which is which.




You need to remove the timing cover from your engine. On this bike it is on the right side of the engine, the front little cover. It has 5 bolts securing it.

This cover has one of the nicest features I have ever seen on and engine cover - O-RING!!!! No stupid paper gaskets! :cool I could have reused this one, but I already bought a replacement, might as well use it.

Original O-ring off the cover.


Your timing system is hidden behind the cover. Behind the timing gear is the camshaft timing chain.



To check the valve clearances on this bike the manual says to set the 1,4 T mark to be even with the split in the engine case. You check the IN and EX marks on the cams to know which set of valves you can check.

I found that the manual advice of setting the cams for valve clearance checks was woefully inadequate. Below is what the manual tells you to do to check the valves. On my bike the lobes of cylinder 3 were pressing on the buckets, thus making it impossible to check the clearance. I will describe what to do after this section.



Here the timing marks are shown facing each other. This puts piston #4 (the rightmost piston when sitting on the bike) in the TDC position.



According to the Service Manual - at this timing configuration you can check Intake valves for Cyl 2 and Cyl 4, and Exhaust valves on Cyl #3 and Cyl #4.
The little picture in the manual shows black circles. You measure the valves marked with the black circles not the open circles!

Click for picture:
Manual Alignment Pic.

This next picture shows the cams lined up with the timing marks are set for piston #1 at TDC. This is one crank of the engine - the cams move 1/2 the number of degrees of the crank. That puts the marks are 180 degrees from their previous orientation.



Here you can see why I think the manual is full of it for this task - at the settings it claims you can check the #3 cylinder intake valve clearances - this is what you get! The lobe of the cam is CLEARLY starting to push on the bucket. There is no way you're getting a feeler gauge in there.

 

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Falcn , I am new here and for one hope you continue with this . I appreciate the time and effort you are putting into this . Even if I am not ever brave enough to takle valve adjustment this is making me very familiar with the motor for other tasks I want to do . Thank you - Gary
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Part Deux of Part Deux - This is what we're really here for!


OK - now this is how you can reliably check the valves - one whole cylinder at a time. I moved from the right #4 cylinder back to the left towards cyl #1 - it's easier that way since you are on the right side at first and can turn the engine over. I found a nice article on Motorcyclistonline.com about checking valve clearance and associated cam lobe positions using the very method I used and will explain below.


You start out by setting the #1, 4 mark even with the case split as mentioned in the manual - to be able to check cylinder #4 you make sure that the valve lobes are pointing out away from each other (the exhaust one pointing to the back of the engine, the intake one pointing to the front of the engine). They will be pointed up - almost 45 degrees. Now measure the intake and exhaust valves on cylinder number 4.

Here is what the #4 intake lobe will look like when you can check the clearances on the INTAKE AND EXHAUST on the same cylinder.



The exhaust lobe will be pointing up the same amount and point towards the front of the bike as seen in this picture. Again you will be able to check the INTAKE AND EXHAUST valves on the #4 cylinder when you have the #4 piston at TDC.



To check the valves on cylinder #3 you rotate the crank to line up the #2, 3 timing mark with the case split and check to make sure that the cam lobes are pointing away from each other, again pointed up at about 45 degrees. Reference the above pictures, but pretend you are looking at the cam lobes for cyl #3 ;) Now measure the intake and exhaust valves on cylinder number 3.

To check cylinder # 2 you turn the crank again until the #2, 3 timing mark lines up with the case split. Make sure that the cam lobes are facing away from each other, again pointing up at about 45 degrees. Now measure the intake and exhaust valves on cylinder number 2.

To finally check cylinder #1 on the left side of the engine you turn the crank again to line up the #1, 4 timing mark on the case split. For the last time make sure that the cam lobes on cylinder number one are pointing away from each other and up at about 45 degrees. Now measure the intake and exhaust valves on cylinder number 1.

To check the clearances you need some feeler gauges. I use the bent blade type on engines like this with cam caps that cover access. I typically start with the lowest gap feeler gauge and work my way up. If the gauge won't go into the gap between the lobe and the bucket you need to move to the next size down. You may be able to force a gauge between the cam lobe and bucket - but this is not a valid reading. There should be a slight drag, but not enough to pull the gauge from your grip if you just hold it lightly. The next size UP should not be able to fit. I have a set of feeler gauges that have a couple very fine gauges, at 0.0015 and 0.0025 - which I can combine with thicker gauges to see if I am at a half step between thousands (we're talking inches here).

On my bike I found that the following valves were out of spec, below the listed minimum clearance:
Intake #1, Right Valve
Intake #2, Right Valve

Exhaust #1, Left Valve
Exhaust #2, Right Valve
Exhaust #3, Right Valve
Exhaust #4, Left Valve
Exhaust #4, Right Valve

For those keeping count that is 7 valves below minimum clearance at 14,000 miles.

ALL other valves were at the MINIMUM clearance. I don’t like to let my bikes run at minimum clearance with 15,000 miles between clearance checks, so I opted to change all the shims in my engine.

For the intake valves the clearances are listed as 0.15– to-0.24mm (0.0059-to-0.0094 in.) and the exhaust valve clearances are listed as .22-to-.31mm (0.0087-to-0.0122 in.)

In order to proceed with changing your clearance on this engine you will need 7.48mm diameter shims. You can buy them from Kawasaki if you wish, waiting until you pull apart the engine and know what size you need to order, and then run down to the dealership and get them, then run home and finish the valve change – OR you can buy a shim kit.

I opted to buy a skim kit, or rather, build a shim kit out of Hotcams shim kit refill packs. Using the shim kit refill packs lets you get 5 of one size of shim versus 3. The Z750S parts microfiche lists shims from 2.50-3.50mm as being available for this engine. I had from 2.70-3.20 covered- I was banking on the fact that we found no shims out of the 2.95-3.05 range in Eric’s ZX6R – plus the fact that he said I could have any shims of sizes I didn’t have from his kit.

Ok – so now you’ve got your shim kit. You are ready to take the cams and buckets out of the engine and swap the shims.

The first thing you need to do is align the #1, 4 mark on the timing gear with the split on the engine case.



Then you should take out your favorite light colored paint pen. Verify that the cam timing marks on the camshafts are facing OUT away from each other. At this point you should verify that you have 30 (thirty) chain pins between the timing marks.

Edit: Picture from manual removed - you can count the links fine from the picture I took.

At this point you take your paint pen and highlight the timing mark and the adjacent cam chain pin. You do this so that when you put the camshafts back into the engine after removal you don’t have to count the pins again. If the chain pops off during reinstallation of the cam chain tensioner or when you are tightening down the cam caps you won’t have to count pins. You will simply line up your marks and go from there again.

Here you can see where I have marked the cam sprockets and the adjacent cam chain pins.


This is a close-up of the exhaust side cam sprocket marking. Sorry about the fuzziness.



Now that you need to take out the cams to change the shims, you can also do something else to make your life a little easier. Remove the upper right radiator hose from the top of the radiator. This is the one I had tucked out against the frame in the steps above. It just makes getting to the cam cap bolts on the right side easier.



Another thing you should do now that you will be dealing with little bitty metal pieces (shims) and bolts is to put some paper towels or rags in your spark plug holes, and also cover around your cam chain tunnel. This will help in the event that you drop a bolt or shim. You don’t want that stuff ending up in your engine. For the sake of clear photos I did not put anything in my cam chain tunnel.


After all the prep work you are ready to start removing the pieces that will let you pull the cams off the engine. The first thing you need to do is remove the cam chain tensioner (CCT). You first remove the main tensioning bolt from the center of the CCT.

Behind the main bolt will be a sealing washer, and from within the center of the bolt will drop out a spring and a rod. The rod rides in the center of the spring to keep it from deforming as it exerts the pressure against the cam chain tensioner inside the engine. I am not sure if the direction the rod faces is important, but I never switch it around.



Here is the CCT with the main bolt removed.


After you remove the CCT main bolt you remove the CCT mounting bolts. Gently work the CCT body out of the hole. It will seem stuck because of the o-ring used to seal the bore against oil leaks. Once you get the CCT body removed set it aside with the rest of the parts.



Here is the CCT. The ramp is what pushes against the tensioner inside the engine – the piece that actually pushes on the chain. The “stopper” as the manual calls it is a ratchet mechanism that keeps the ramp from retracting once the spring has pushed it forwards.



This terminology will come into play when we reinstall the CCT after swapping out the shims.

Now that the CCT is out of the engine it is safe to remove the camshafts. The manual did not list any particular order for removing the cam cap bolts, which I found strange since my friends 2006 ZX6R manual had us remove the cam cap bolts on his bike in a specific order. Oh well. I proceeded to loosen the bolts from the cam chain side of the engine and worked my way left. I broke all of them free the first time, rather than removing any bolts yet.

I bought a 3hp, 21 gallon compressor from Harbor Freight. I have to say – I LOVE IT for driving the mini ¼ inch air ratchet that I purchased just for working on the bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I removed the bolts from the cam chain side over to the left side of the engine, one whole row of 4 at a time. The only exception to this was that I removed the top chain guide first before removing the other two bolts along the same line.



After doing this same job on NatronaZX6R’s bike I really love this top cam chain guide! It will be your friend when it is time to put the cams back into the engine.



Here are some shots of the cam cap bolts being undone. An air ratchet really does make this easier!





To be clear, you are taking the cam cap bolts out of the caps for both the intake and exhaust in this case.

Once you have all the bolts out and set aside in a safe place (I use plastic cups or Ziploc bags) you can pull the cam cap of choice off the engine. I typically leave one cam in the engine and work on one at a time. You can pull both, but just make sure you tie the cam chain up so it doesn’t fall into the tunnel in that case.

I’m not sure if the color of the bolts is important, but I noticed that 4 of the cam cap bolts were silver when the rest were black. I documented where they went on the cam caps to be able to put them back in the same place. Edit Oct-1-2009: The silver bolts are a different length than the black bolts - their location is important. (Thanks Mike Livingston)

Two went on the #1 cylinder side of the engine, and the other two went inboard of the top cam chain guide set of bolts.





At this point DO NOT TURN THE ENGINE WITH THE TIMING GEAR!!

This time around I started with the intake cam. I pulled off the cam cap, and placed it inverted on some clean shop towels. Then I pulled the chain up enough to allow me to slip the cam out of the top of the engine. I went out the right side since I didn’t want to maneuver the cam sprocket under the frame.



Once the cam is out you can see the buckets. The valve shims are under the buckets.



Since I had a shim kit I did not take all of the buckets and shims out of the engine (at least for the intake cam) to measure them and see if I could swap any between valves. I started on the left side of the engine and worked on one shim ad bucket at a time.

In order to measure the shims you will need either a micrometer (probably overkill for the precision they provide) or a caliper. I mainly use the calipers myself, though I have both.

You can see in this picture the tools mentioned, the caliper is on the top, the micrometer underneath that, and to the right under the micrometer is an inverted bucket with the shim to the left off it. The shim normally sits in the center of the bucket on the machined little circle.



You need to measure the current shim and write it’s thickness down for reference. Then you can either check the chart in the book to see what size shim they recommend to get to the specified clearance, or you can simply do the math yourself. I tried to target the middle of the clearance range specified by Kawi when deciding on the shim size.

An example of how to do this follows.

Say your clearance is measured on an intake valve at 0.005 (which is below spec. min of .006). You need to increase the gap, so you need a smaller shim than the stock one. You measure the stock shim and find it is 3.02 mm in thickness. 0.005 inches is 0.127mm (multiply inches by 25.4 to get mm). The middle ground you could aim for would be .195mm. Since you HAD 0.127mm clearance and you WANT .195mm you need to decrease the shim thickness by 0.195-0.127 = 0.068mm. The original shim minus the needed difference is 3.02 – 0.068 = 2.952. The nearest shim size is 2.95mm. Typically I have found that it is ok to go 2 sizes under the shim calculated this way and still be within measured clearance range. The example shown here is an actual measurement from my engine. The measured clearance after the change was closer to .007 inches due to the shim not being a true 2.95mm. I didn’t feel like sanding it down the .01 mm. :D

I proceeded one shim/bucket at a time and put the original shim in a container with a piece of paper marking their size in case I needed that size on another valve. To remove the shim and bucket I use a magnetic pickup tool This makes the job very easy and the shim attached to the underside of the bucket.

After all the shims have been changed to the desired thickness, you will put the intake cam back into the cam journals. I typically apply engine assembly lube to the journals on the head and the cam cap before putting the cam back into them.

Put the cam back into the journals on the head and align the timing mark you made on the chain with the mark you made on the sprocket.

Now you can pull the exhaust cam out of the engine. When I did the exhaust cam shim changes I did it a little differently than the intake cam. I removed the cam cap and placed it inverted on a shop towel. I then removed ALL of the buckets and shims and placed them on the towel below the cam in the order they would be in the engine.

 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
last one and done!

I then measured all the original exhaust shims taken out of the engine and determined that some could be swapped between valves to gain the desired clearances. This saved some of my shims in the shim kit for next time. ;)

After determining a proper shim change, I would put the shim into the bucket and put it back in the engine, marking on my tracking sheet which shim went into the bucket, and also which buckets were placed back into the engine.

Proceed until all shims are changed.

To put a shim/bucket back into the engine I again used my magnetic pickup tool. This holds the shim in place on the underside of the bucket. Alternately you could place the shim in the middle of the valve keeper and then place the bucket on top of it, but I don’t like trying to hold onto that little tiny 7.58mm wide shim with my hand at a weird angle trying to maneuver over an open engine.

Still I did it for one valve on the right side of the engine so I could get a picture of what the shim looks like sitting on top of the valve.


After you have swapped all of the shims on both cams that you wnt to swap it is time to put the cams back into the engine. In my case the intake cam was already aligned with the mark I made on the cam chain previously.

Install the camshaft and line up the marks you made so that you have 30 pins between the IN and EX marks on the respective cams (see picture posted above regarding pins on the chain).



The manual states to keep the exhaust side of the chain pulled tight when installing the timing chain. You will note that the intake timing mark does not align with the head during this initial reinstallation – this is OK. It will pull tight and align once you get the CCT installed in the engine.

The manual gives a specific order of cam cap bolt installation. This is shown here.

Picture of tightening order of bolts

I deviated only slightly and put the top cam chain guide in and finger tightened the bolts. This helps to keep the timing chain from jumping a tooth when you are tightening down the cam caps and also when you are installing the CCT.



Other than that I followed the installation order to the T. I once again used my trusty air ratchet. Don’t worry – I turned it down, and even at the maximum setting it only makes 20 in-lb of torque – not enough to do any damage to the engine. The torque for the cam cap bolts is 104 inch-lbs.

The manual states that before you install the camshaft caps and chain guide to temporarily install the CCT body. If you do this be sure you press down on the chain to keep it from skipping a tooth. Before you reinstall the CCT you must press on the stopper and retract the ramp to the first position. Install the CCT so that the stopper is on the top.

I should mention that there are dowel pins for the cam caps and you should make sure these are in place before tightening down any bolts.

Once you have loosely gotten all the bolts started you go back again and follow the same pattern of tightening, this time snugging down the bolts to pull the cam cap flush with the head mating surface, but don’t torque it to the final value.

The way I did the reinstallation was to put the cam caps on before installing the CCT. As mentioned I lightly installed the top chain guide as well. If you feel safer following the manual instructions, please feel free to do so  This worked out easier for me in the end.

After you snug all the bolts down, go back in and tighten them all to the final torque of 104 in-lbs.

This picture shows the top chain guide installed loosely – you can see the slack in the chain.



In the following picture you will see the chain after the cam caps have been tightened down and the cam cap bolts torqued to final settings. Note how the chain has tried to raise up on the right side and skip a tooth. BAD CHAIN!



It is simply a matter of pressing down on the center of the chain to get it to align with the teeth again. This is the reason that I install the cam guide at the top before told to do so in the manual. The chain wants to jump because as you tighten the cam caps, some of the lobes of the cams are pushing directly on the buckets, causing the cams to try and rotate slightly.

After the cam caps are installed I then install the CCT. Set the ramp back to the first setting. Carefully use the CCT mounting bolts to “walk” the CCT into the hole. It will not go into the hole just with you pressing on the body, as it is going to be pressing on the chain tensioner/slider. This will have the effect again of pulling the camshafts, pushing some of the lobes further into the valve buckets. I kept a pen between the chain guide and the chain to help prevent the chain from jumping a tooth. You will still note that the timing mark on the intake cam will not be aligned to the head.

Once the CCT is body is installed and the mounting bolts are set to 95 in-lbs of torque, you can install the CCT Cap Bolt. This is the bolt that has the hollow where the spring and rod fit.

Here it is again.


You can replace the o-ring before installation. I did not.

Install this in the CCT body – be careful upon installation not to cross-thread the bolt. It will require you to push to compress the spring enough to get the threads started in the hole. Torque the CCT Cap Bolt to 21 ft-lb.

While installing the CCT Cap Bolt do not be alarmed if the ramp does not extend and take up the slack in the cam chain. After you torque the cap bolt you will rotate the engine 2x using the timing gear bolt. For me the CCT ramped out as soon as I started to move the crank.

Rotate the engine the 2x clockwise, then check to make sure you still have 30 pins between the timing marks when you align the #1, 4 mark with the engine case split. Note: you will not be able to line up your original markings unless you turn the engine a lot, so I don’t bother. I just count the 30 pins again for verification.

Your engine’s camshafts are now installed back in the engine. At this point you get to measure the engine clearances all over again! You do this to verify your work and make sure that you have obtained good clearances for any valves that were out of specification.

If anything is still out of specification you will have to go through the whole procedure again!

Assuming you did your math correctly and all your clearances are now within specification you can now install the new valve cover gasket. Be sure to put RTV in the little valleys on the side of the head.



Proceed with installing the valve cover, make sure all the spark plug hole gaskets are in place, as well as the dowel pins for the gaskets. Install the cover bolts – if any of the washers came out of their holes in the head cover, the metal side goes UP.

There is a specified sequence for tightening the valve cover bolts. Start at the intake side, leftmost bolt. Snug this down but don’t torque it to the final value. Proceed to the rightmost bolt on the cover on the intake side of the engine. The third bolt to tighten is the one in front of the 2nd bolt. Then proceed to the leftmost bolt on the exhaust side of the head. Then tighten down the bolt in the middle on the intake side and finally the middle one at the front of the engine. Follow the same pattern, this time torque to the final setting – and then go back and check bolt #2 and bolt #1 in that order.

Don’t forget to install the timing cover on the side of the engine.

Install all the parts that you removed to be able to get to the valve cover in the first place. Fun fun. Once you havethe thermostat and radiator hosed and all vacuum hoses and electrical connectors reinstalled you can fill the coolant system. Fill it until you top off the level at the fill cap on the thermostat housing. Then you should squeeze and tap the upper radiator hoses to get the air out of the system. You will notice the coolant level at the fill cap drop. Add more coolant again to top off. Squeeze the hoses some more, until no more coolant can be added. Close the cap.

Install the tank – reconnecting the gas line and level sensor and fuel pump power connectors.

Start the bike and listen for any noises. If you hear any bad noises STOP THE ENGINE. Tear it back apart and find out what you did wrong. ;)

If it purrs along then you simply let it run until the cooling fan kicks on, then you shut it off and let it cool. After the bike cools, check the overflow bottle coolant level. If it is not between the low and full lines, add more coolant to the overflow bottle.

DONE!

Make the bike ready to ride and go out and enjoy the new engine feel and smoothness. Don't forget to balance your throttle bodies after this ;)
 

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Falcn , I am new here and for one hope you continue with this . I appreciate the time and effort you are putting into this . Even if I am not ever brave enough to takle valve adjustment this is making me very familiar with the motor for other tasks I want to do . Thank you - Gary

+1 thanks for taking the time on writing this up. :notworthy
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys. I plan on making a PDF version of this when I get time. I have all the text saved in Word. I just need to go back and replace all the tags in the document with real pictures and convert it over.

That way people can print it out easier if they want.
 

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Fantastic write up falcn!!! I have this page bookmarked. I'm only at 8500 miles, but that 15000 mark is coming up fast!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You're local to me if you need help ;)
 

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Brilliant mate! I put off doing this at the 15,000 mile service because it was such a pain in the arse but this post has made it much easier. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Brilliant mate! I put off doing this at the 15,000 mile service because it was such a pain in the arse but this post has made it much easier. Thanks.
Thank you for the kind words. This is what I hoped would happen with this thread, that people would gain some insight and be able tackle the job themselves.
 

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I just checked and adjusted my valves last week end. I am at 65 000 km and I had never adjusted them before.

Basically the exhaust valves were a bit on the tight side with the intake valves being right on the money.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I just checked and adjusted my valves last week end. I am at 65 000 km and I had never adjusted them before.

Basically the exhaust valves were a bit on the tight side with the intake valves being right on the money.
Did this thread help?:alcy:
 

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Superb write up, Falcn!

A couple of weeks back I took my bike to a Kawaski dealership for the 15000 mile service, specifically so they could check valve clearances. It turns out that they just did compression tests instead of physically checking. Is this a reliable alternative?

It seems that I will have to tackle this job when I next service my bike and this thread makes me feel much more confident.

Do you have to use an air wrench, or would it be possible to get normal spanners/sockets in there?
 

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A compression check as a substitute for actually checking valve clearances with a gauge is about the dumbest thing I have heard in quite some time!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Superb write up, Falcn!
Thanks, Tim.

I guess a compression check could tell you that your valves aren't overly tight and not closing all the way, but that won't tell if you they are way too loose, or tight enough to need adjustment, but not yet leaking.

So, no that is not a valid substitute.

You do not "NEED" to use an air ratchet, you can fit regular ratchets in there for the most part. I did all the torques by hand with a long 3/8" drive in-lb torque wrench - so you should have plenty of room. I also broke all the bolts free with my Gearratchet "hollow" ratchet set - so I was easily ably to get a full size tool in there.

This was the perfect use for an air ratchet though - or an electric ratchet. Lots of tedious tightening and loosening of lots of bolts! My wrist would have been worn out.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I just got a PM with a question:

The inlet and exhaust valves shims are the same diameters, 7.48mm.

Sorry if this was not clear.
 
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