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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys! I'm coming from a background of naked bikes and supermotos and i'm curious what cruisers are all about. I've been thinking about getting a cruiser as a second bike sometime in the future but since i have no idea if it's going to be my thing i don't want to spend a whole bunch of money. My budget would be around 3000€ so i'm looking at mid to late 90's and early 00's japanese bikes. One of my main priorities is being able to ride comfortably with my gf on the back for longish rides. So my question is: should i be looking at bikes in the 750-1100cc range for a smoother transition as far as the weight of the bike goes or would i be fine going straight for a bike in the 1300-1800cc range? Any and all thoughts and suggestions are welcome!
 

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I had a Yamaha V-Star 650 for 2 up riding with me and the Mrs. Neither of us are lightweights and the bike did well. I'd strongly suggest making a smaller investment in a mid range cruiser to get a feel for it instead of going all in with a higher end big CC bike. Cruisers are WAY heavier than sportbikes, so prepare yourself for the jump. My V-Star was about 550lbs wet by itself. I paid $3k US for it with all kind of extras and sold it 2 years later for $2500 with no extras on it.
 

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I previously had a cruiser. It was a Honda Shadow Aero 750. It was lower than my Ninja 650R, heavier and less maneuverable. But it also was less likely to get tossed around on a windy day, which is a big plus in North Dakota.

I also found that the feet-forward seating position common to cruisers meant that all of my weight was on my tailbone, and I couldn't shift around to change the pressure point. My Ninja 650R allows me to shift front and back on the seat, changing the pressure points, and I can even ride standing up to restore circulation on long rides.

I know a lot of people who love their cruisers. You might like them, too. But that style of bike is probably not for me.
 

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I previously had a cruiser. It was a Honda Shadow Aero 750. It was lower than my Ninja 650R, heavier and less maneuverable. But it also was less likely to get tossed around on a windy day, which is a big plus in North Dakota.

I also found that the feet-forward seating position common to cruisers meant that all of my weight was on my tailbone, and I couldn't shift around to change the pressure point. My Ninja 650R allows me to shift front and back on the seat, changing the pressure points, and I can even ride standing up to restore circulation on long rides.

I know a lot of people who love their cruisers. You might like them, too. But that style of bike is probably not for me.
Baxter added a lot of detail that I skipped. The VStar didn't get tossed around in the wind like my Ninja 650 or my 250. I spent the $$ for a sargent seat, which was super awesome. The bike came with a Corbin and I hated that thing. They supposedly "break in" but the Sargent set was perfect right out of the box, for less $$ than a Corbin. I dug the casual seating position and the stability of the heavier and lower COG. She did fine for the few rides the wife and I took together, and for a time I was commuting on it with my son on the back. Make sure you find one that has your hands at most at the same level of your shoulders, ideally lower, so you don't lose circulation to the hands while riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for sharing your experiences! I guess my best option would be to testride as many different cruisers as possible before pulling the trigger on any one of them. Hopefully a few testrides would give me a better idea if cruisers are going to be my thing or not. And good point about not being able to move around in the seat to change up the pressure points, I hadn't even thought about that. The more I think about it the more I realise I do it every so often on my current bike (honda cb600f hornet). Anyway, thanks again for taking the time to answer!
 

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Not all cruisers have forward controls. Those without you can easily stand up on and "stretch" your legs.
I have forward controls on mine and I just stretch out a leg forward while riding.
I'm tall so sometimes I press back and slide up on the back passenger part. Rarely do but when the groin is hot the air comes in and cools ya down quick.
Pic is of when I bought it, that air intake has been replaced.


Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
 

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So, Cruiser is a sitting position and has nothing to do with engine configuration. There have been inline 4 cruisers, V-4 Cruisers, Parallel Twin Cruisers, Opposed twin cruisers, Inline 3 cylinder cruisers as well as several different angle V-twin cruisers varying from 90 degree to 45 degree.

There are old school cruisers, bobbers, choppers, power cruisers, touring cruisers, etc.

There are sporty cruisers and land yacht cruisers.

There are upright sitting, leaned back sitting, as well as leaned forward sitting cruisers.

There are cruisers designed for solo bar hopping all the way to two up touring the world.

A 650cc Yamaha V-twin cruiser isn't even in the same league as the Kawasaki Vulcan S 650cc parallel twin cruiser. You need to look at torque and HP numbers for the bikes you are interested in. Torque is the more important number when it comes to cruisers.
 
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