RiderForums.com - Kawasaki Motorcycle Forum banner

81 - 100 of 106 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,328 Posts
You make sense, and I get it. For me, it's a serious step backwards, in safety. I'm not our pushing things to the limit on a normal basis. I like those high limits when something unexpected happens.

I feel like most fatal crashes I see will be on a bike like this. A modern machine built with the best technology 1970 had to offer. Who's to say. He may have avoided the car has he been riding something that would handle. Maybe better brakes would have allowed him to slow. Of course, no need for a helmet as its not against the law.

I think if the American public took a huge interest in restoring 1972 ford pints, and driving them, we would see someone step in and stop the nonsense. However, in motorcycling, it's encouraged, and it's cool.

This guy never really needed a good handling machine, or a helmet, until he hit the fender. Then it made sense.

Motorcyclist killed in crash on I-15 identified - Story | Utah
Rider skill, not bike choice. It is called following too closely. A dual sport set up for dual sporting would have had the same issue. A Concours would have had the same issue. I whipped my Concours to the right in an evasive maneuver at 70mph and the suspension complained greatly.

Troopers could write thousands of tickets a day for following too close.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,694 Posts
I know my concours, or my ninja will make an evasive maneuver at 70, and both have brakes that will allow it to stop. Maybe the added power allows him to accelerate past the fender? I know its impossible to say, but I bet he, and his family wish he had a try with a better bike?



Magna is a interesting part of the salt lake Valley. Built around the mining industry and trip down main street is a step back to 1970.

Actually, Disney has a series that is filmed there, so Disney fixed it up. Small Utah town becomes set of Disney Channel's newest

That has to explain the city, and the fact that they can block it off for filming!

I always liked this test. I went back a few years as a better variety of motorcycles are tested.

Its pretty obvious which bikes I would feel more comfortable riding
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #83 ·
You say that but are you sure? If for example, he was on a sportbike perhaps he could've reacted to the car he hit the fender and maneuvered? It's much more difficult to maneuver a bike that has comfy suspension and weighs 700 lbs and a Cadillac wheelbase.

Certainly when it comes to the last iota of safety, relative to prevailent ABS madness these days, a well handling bike compared to a log has to be a signficantly greater factor than ABS.
I am sure. Everything in twa's signature line is what matters as long as whatever bike one has chosen is street legal and in good working order. Otherwise, we all would have to choose the same bike with bleeding edge acceleration, braking, handling capabilities just to increase, on paper, our chance to avoid an incident. Not possible. Most people on the road wouldn't have the skill to take advantage of the bleeding edge specifications anyway because they would be riding beyond their capabilities. Some things can't be avoided. The article makes no mention of the type of bike, but does mention that there was no helmet. Does not mention if no helmet was a deciding factor in the outcome. It was really a weak story and I don't want to say anything to disparage the deceased because it could happen to anyone at anytime, no matter the skill or bike.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Obo

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,694 Posts
That's the thing, a lot of us have done this for 40 plus years,and do have the skill to take advantage of great brakes, good handling, and huge power.

I don't need myself as an example, we can use jjsc6. Long time racer, and you won't see him on anything other than a machine with handling and braking abilities to match. I don't know if it was a specific decision he made, but if he crashes, you won't be able to point to dated technology as a contributing factor.

I would park my bike and take up sports cars if I felt my skills were so limited that a 21 in front tire cruiser maxed me out.

Modern bikes even step in and try to bridge that skills gap with abs and traction control
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,694 Posts
That's the thing, a lot of us have done this for 40 plus years,and do have the skill to take advantage of great brakes, good handling, and huge power. I can't imagine participating in such a dangerous activity, and not holding myself to the highest standard. Don't we own this to our loved ones, if not ourselves?

I don't need myself as an example, we can use jjsc6. Long time racer, and you won't see him on anything other than a machine with handling and braking abilities to match. I don't know if it was a specific decision he made, but if he crashes, you won't be able to point to dated technology as a contributing factor.

I would park my bike and take up sports cars if I felt my skills were so limited that a 21 in front tire cruiser maxed me out.

Modern bikes even step in and try to bridge that skills gap with abs and traction control
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,525 Posts
I am sure. Everything in twa's signature line is what matters as long as whatever bike one has chosen is street legal and in good working order. Otherwise, we all would have to choose the same bike with bleeding edge acceleration, braking, handling capabilities just to increase, on paper, our chance to avoid an incident. Not possible. Most people on the road wouldn't have the skill to take advantage of the bleeding edge specifications anyway because they would be riding beyond their capabilities. Some things can't be avoided. The article makes no mention of the type of bike, but does mention that there was no helmet. Does not mention if no helmet was a deciding factor in the outcome. It was really a weak story and I don't want to say anything to disparage the deceased because it could happen to anyone at anytime, no matter the skill or bike.
The video shows the bike. It's looks fairly cruiser-like, although I don't know make/model. Agreed, most accidents are combination of a few things going wrong at just the right time.

My gut feelings on this accident tells me the guy wasn't paying attention. And that's my point. If he had been on something more sporty, a N1000, he may have MADE it past the car he ended up hitting.

I like your new bike. I've always liked (most) Harley's styling. But you have to admit, that bike is far from optimal in many ways in terms of safety. It's not going to turn very well or responsive. As RC's pointed out, it's got tiny tires and tiny brakes, so it's not going to stop very well. I'm sure it's got soft suspension, that's a minus to boot. It's 600lbs (stock). It's not going to accelerate particularly well. But I'm more performance minded, and that's where Harley and I go our separate ways.

I don't even know where to start with your statement about the bike not mattering. All motorcycles are not created equal just because their in operating condition. A motorcycle that can stop in 120 feet from 60 has many advantages over one that takes 150 feet. If I have to tell you that, you're thinking in your own little world and not the one everyone else is. If I also have to tell you that somtimes you need to accelerate for safety, and that indeed, sometimes faster is better, you're in your own little world.

Now don't get me wrong. I understand performance like anything else can, and is abused. But it's no worse when that happens than when some dude goes out crusing around the country side and turns their brain off.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #87 · (Edited)
I appreciate your post Vic and agree with it. My meaning is once a rider chooses which bike he's going to ride THEN the bike doesn't matter. It's up to the rider to operate within his and the bike's capabilities and limitations. I tested all those super naked bikes with the latest technology and really liked them up to the point of buying the Tuono. But I decided I wanted a big chopper/cruiser, so I won't be riding it the same way I would have the Tuono.

Same deal with my ZR7. It has no great speed/braking/handling capabilities and no advanced technology, but I choose to ride it and have to deal with its limitations. I know the brakes are as good as they can be because I rebuilt them myself. I just dropped 1700 on a new suspension, so it should handle as well as its tube frame and power to weight will allow. No ABS, no TC, no IMU, no ECU or power modes. Nothing... just a mediocre machine I happen to love riding.

The rider counts infinitesimally more than the bike when it comes to safety.

@rcannon... should we not continue to drive and enjoy an old Bel Air or Cadillac because it doesn't have ABS, disc brakes, traction control, air bags, dimming mirrors, On Star, etc. If my only option is to choose and ride the latest machines...

Very skilled riders choose to ride and enjoy big cruisers for fun, relaxation, to look cool, to be like their friends, etc. Riding isn't all about going fast and pushing the machine. It's about having fun.

You will notice that YouTube is full of squids and not so squids having bad wrecks on super sports, the most capable machines out there, because they are acting like squids. The bike doesn't matter; it's how it is used.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bearclaw

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,694 Posts
Daddy, you made some very good points, and I agree with most of them..There is no doubt the rider makes a bigger difference than the bike.

But, in those moments when a person needs both skill and equipment to avoid a crash, I would much rather be on the machine that gives me the best chance to use what skills I have.

As far as relaxation, and looking cool, the last thing that is relaxing is trying to hold myself up against a 60 mph wind blast. especially, if I am laying back, lazy-boy style. If it then becomes looking cool, and looking like my friends vs performance, I dont even know how to answer that one.

As far as the old cars go, I would never put my family in one. I want them in the newest and best I can afford. It will have (hopefully, thank you takada) better airbags, advanced traction control, and maybe even accident avoidance.

I cant see them wanting any less , for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,328 Posts
The bottom line is that if you rear end someone, you were following too closely. If you are in a hi performance sports car you can follow a little closer than if you are in a loaded semi-truck.

If you are on SS bike you might get away with following closer than on a cruiser.

How did any of us survive on 60s to 80s technology motorcycles?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #90 ·
We're coming to common ground on this issue. Neither one of my bikes are particularly advanced in any area of performance or technology. I did have two bikes that were marginally advanced (2011 Connie; 2014 Triumph Explorer), but they were completely boring to ride for both recreation and transportation, for my use and the way I ride. I found myself falling asleep on the interstate and the bikes were too heavy and cumbersome on the back roads. So I decided I didn't want to spend a whole lot of time on interstates anymore and going with the 7 for light touring and the hog for just polishing and puttering around town and short jaunts. I don't race, track day, ride in groups, or live/ride where there are a lot of people and traffic. I believe the bike and rider have to match the conditions.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bearclaw

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,694 Posts
Thats funny, and so true.

We survived the 80's as we knew no better, and had no better. I dont know if Evil, himself, would have considered something this crazy.

VIDEO: Daredevil motorcyclist jumps across Southern California freeway, sparks investigation | abc7news.com

But, technology advanced. Now, I would no more trust an 80's era bike to stop, brake or handle any more so than I would trust a 80's helmet to protect my head.

It would not bother me , at all, to have a low performance machine if I could schedule when and where the close calls would be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,328 Posts
Thats funny, and so true.

We survived the 80's as we knew no better, and had no better. I dont know if Evil, himself, would have considered something this crazy.

VIDEO: Daredevil motorcyclist jumps across Southern California freeway, sparks investigation | abc7news.com

But, technology advanced. Now, I would no more trust an 80's era bike to stop, brake or handle any more so than I would trust a 80's helmet to protect my head.

It would not bother me , at all, to have a low performance machine if I could schedule when and where the close calls would be.
You must live where all the roads are congested. I can ride roads where seeing someone else is a rarity. That is where I ride my low performance machines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
Just ride it, enjoy it, I'm hesitating selling my meanstreak because it's a very engaging machine, love my new super tenere they just have very different personalities, emotionally the meanstreak just gets my heart going , the super tenere is way safer on paper and standing up feeling like your literally flying through the air has its own thrill, also being able to take it anywhere is awesome, they are just good at different things ...Ride all bikes under their limits , ride defensively and enjoy the journey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,694 Posts
I saw car get run over by a semi today. He was about 300yards ahead of me. Not like it was a close call, or anything.

I saw the tractor raise up as it went through the intersection. A green compact car had ran the red light and there was nothing the semi driver could do.

It just reminded me that we can be safe and do everything in our power to be so, but if your time is up, there won't be much we can do. I learned later the compact car driver was dead
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #96 ·
Been enjoying working on and riding the new Hog. Only ~800 miles because I've had to spend time waiting for parts and tuning it, but the last few hundred miles have been really good. When I first got it, the rear plug was burning out every 100 miles or so; once almost left me stranded (not really, but I thought I was out of gas when it happened).

aplug.jpg

I replaced the intake seals and rebuilt the carb about a half dozen times until I got it right. Ended up replacing the needle, needle jet, main jet, pilot jet, slide, accelerator pump, and adjusting the float. Bought a set of Magnecor plug wires. Disconnected and cleaned/improved all the grounds and main electrical connections, and went through the ignition system, which I determined was in okay shape. So far, doesn't appear to burn oil and hasn't put a drop on the ground. Plugs now running pretty even.

aplugs.jpg

When I first started, the bike was running rough and getting about 30MPG; it wouldn't rev over about 2500RPM in the first three gears. Now I'm getting 46MPG and the bike pulls pretty strong out to 4000RPM; I hope I'm not running too lean in the long run. No worries though, I'm just riding and making changes if I feel like it. Only thing it really needs is a new front brake line because the DOT5 is seeping through the line.

adyna.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,920 Posts
I haven't had "high rise/apes" on a bike in years. How do you like them on your bike D.F.? You find them comfortable enough, or have you considered different bars?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,328 Posts
I haven't had "high rise/apes" on a bike in years. How do you like them on your bike D.F.? You find them comfortable enough, or have you considered different bars?
Need a picture with him on the bike. Daddyflip is a tall guy. Might be perfect for him.


Since I am still healing I decided might as well install my heated grips and Zumo GPS wiring harness on the Road King. I'll get to give it a deep cleaning / polishing while putting it back together.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #99 ·
I'll get y'all a rider pic tomorrow. I like the apes a lot, though I have been thinking about an alternative. Rather than new bars, I think different grips would suit me better. The Kuryakyn Iso grips are really big and even with a throttle boss, the back of my hand and wrists get tired. I like a large diameter grip on a low bar; I always add foam grip covers. But when you need to hold on, a small diameter seems better. Easier to change grips than bars, too. Plus, I like the way the bars look and feel; it's what I wanted.

The other thing I like, twa hit on in the recent Z900 thread; absolutely no concern over wind buffeting on a bike like this. I'm wearing an Icon Airmada full face on this bike and it is completely silent at all speeds with plenty of airflow. Not so on the ZR7 where the shield puts the wind right over my shoulders- the Airmada is a hurricane! I wear my Shoei GT-Air on the 7; surprisingly, the Shoei isn't as quiet on the Harley for some reason.

Also tomorrow, I start experimenting with fork oil. Going to start with a slight overfill of Torco 10w I have on hand. Hoping to keep it light but reduce some of the jarring clunk I get on the local rough patches. I don't know what's in it right now.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #100 ·
Looks like I forgot to provide a pic... I'll try to remember in the near future. Right now I've got my mind on upgrading the suspension. Lately I haven't been able to ride regularly, so every time I take a ride, I've noticed my lower back and hips have been taking a beating, so it's time for some upgrades. No chance I'm going to sell or trade the Wide Glide, so time to make it right.

First change was pipes. The Freedom Performance Patriots that came with the bike were nice, but they were big, heavy, and the front header pipe broke in half recently because the mounting bolt rattled off (it was make do hardware from the PO). I ordered a set of V&H Straight Shots and they are a way better match for the bike; I am very happy. I have a friend who will weld up the FPs and I'll probably sell them cheap. The Straight Shots have the perfect blend of style and sound. Highway riding they are very quiet, but they will bark loud if I crack the throttle.

IMG_20170810_193556.jpg

Next is supension. I'm either doing RaceTech shocks and springs, Nitron shocks and RaceTech springs, or Progressive shocks and springs. I'm not really sold on the dual rate spring thing that Progressive markets, though they sure do sell a lot of stuff. I have a Nitron on the Kawi and they make pairs for Dyna, but they are the most expensive. As it turns out, I can get the springs in Nitron blue to match the bike, but it might be a little much. They have a classic look that is black spring and silver body that would also match. I'm tempted d to just let RaceTech have all the business this time, but I don't really know much about their shocks.

After this, I'll try to get the bike retuned for the new pipes. It's stumbling a bit on idle but I'm pretty sure I know why... Easy fix. Bike still runs great despite this. I toyed with Cam and head upgrades but I'm going to wait awhile on that.
 
81 - 100 of 106 Posts
Top