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Thanks lionlady for that horrifying but convincing story. I also just started riding. Just took the msf class and got my license. I got a helmet but im still trying to get a riding jacket. Never crossed my mind that i would need a first aid kit. I will be putting one together soon. Oh i got a question tho. So what are the maxi pads for again? I was thinking to absorb blood but dont they have a powders and things on em that might complicate things?
 

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gari,

Great link to the ICE - cards. The "Word" format should make it easy for a lot of people to use and adapt to their own specific needs. Another good idea besides keeping a card in the wallet is to keep one in the riding jacket as well (hopefully we are wearing one). I'll be keeing one in the wallet and in my chest pocket of my Aerostich jacket. :headbang:
 

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I decided on just putting one in my wallet since I wear two different jackets (depending on season) and I assume that someone is going to grab my wallet for ID if I get in a wreck. Hell, ink isn't that much though, so it's probably a good idea to keep one in your bike and at least one on yourself.
 

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Hi guys, I don't want to be the stickler here but as a Paramedic I just wanted to add that helping out is great - if you know what your doing -...
I totally agree with you here, if you know what you are doing yes good you might save a persons life but if you don't know what you are doing you could turn a non life threatening situation into one. I would go so far as to say that if you do not have medical training, advanced first aid training or military combat triage training you really shouldn't try to help because you could just make it worse.
 

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I totally agree with you here, if you know what you are doing yes good you might save a persons life but if you don't know what you are doing you could turn a non life threatening situation into one. I would go so far as to say that if you do not have medical training, advanced first aid training or military combat triage training you really shouldn't try to help because you could just make it worse.

I will agree that people without training shouldn't go outside their means. However, doing nothing and watching someone bleed out shouldn't really be an option either.
 

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Just a note to say that hydrogen peroxide 3% is an excellent disinfectant and also cheap ($ 1 a quart at walmart) and makes a good bug remove for your bike!
 

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So what are the maxi pads for again? I was thinking to absorb blood but dont they have a powders and things on em that might complicate things?
I'm about a year late with this, but, I didn't know this a year ago so here it is.

The absorbent used in feminine hygiene products is similar if not identical to that used in baby diapers and the little white packages placed under the meat you buy at the grocery store. To make a long and technical process and story short, I happened to be visiting a DuPont facility in Germany last month where they make the absorbent. Basically, it is safe for use in most any conceivable situation. You are probably more likely to have problems from the plastic or the fibers which the absorbent is attached to. Ah, the modern marvels of petroleum and chemical engineering.

Oh yeah, the absorbent isn't just loose in the diaper/maxi-pad/whatever, it is generally adhered to the material.
 

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New compression dressings that have been adopted from the Israeli Field dressing are shrink wrapped and double packed! They take up about the same size as two packs of cigarettes ish..., they are absolutely awesome to carry around with you and can be used for catastrophic arterial, veinous and capillary bleeds, direct pressure, indirect pressure and can also be used as slings and burn dressings due to their low adherent properties as well as made into sausages to go round protruding bones or foreign bodies and the inner side of the wrapper is sterile until opened and can be used as a crude container for exposed intestines in the case of an evisceration.

If you do a google search on 'emergency care compression bandage' you can get them in 4 & 6 inch sizes, they petty much replace the old field dressing.

They alone can do more than most mini first aid kits and are so simple to use. When space is at a premium I keep a couple of those, asherman chest seal, op 3/4/5 and np 6/7 airways, duct tape (you'd be surprised how handy and versatile that really is) and a Sam splint under my seat in the tray in a waterproof bag with my jump leads (another long sad story with bad weather and poor choke discipline).

Now helmets... Different areas have different ways of dealing, as a medic and a trainer and more importantly a rider I have my own views on helmet removal and spinal support.

IMHO unless the casualty is having trouble breathing and this should be constantly monitored by you then the big hard head holdie together thing should stay exactly where it is.

That said a chin strap should be undone as that can and has blocked an airway and choked riders, bottom line if the casualty is breathing then apart from undoing the chinstrap and opening the visor weather depending then leave him/her in the position they are in as any movement could cause unnecessary complications. Don't move the casuaty unless you really really have to due to imminent danger to you or them but try to remove the danger first if possible.

If you have specialist training then the rules are different and you should do what you know. But for the passer by or witness the above should ideally apply. If the worst happens and you could end up gripping the rail despite good intention.

I'd make the worst casualty......
 

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I have skipped over this thread many times.Finally read it and found out it makes a lot of sense.Working on my "kit" with the best of all threads.Thanks all for the reminder of that "we wish not to think about".
 

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So, just out of curiosity, are people building up their kits to save your own lives or someone else's?

Off into another something to think about. I work in the largest recreation area in the US. We have over a million visitors a year and they are all on one kind of sand toy or another and we see alot of crashes and no 2 crashes are the same. It's really hard to be prepared for a crash unless you are carrying a full aid bag, an oxygen tank, a back board and have an EMT in your back pocket to do the work, and the chances that you come across an accident scene just after it happens are pretty low unless you cruise a section of road known for motorcycle crashes. Being prepared is a really good thing, but if you are going to put a kit together be sure to check it every now and then and replace the stuff that the wrapping is rubbed through and make sure whatever hard wear you are carrying (scissors, hemostats, etc.) is still wrapped or at least has last weeks KFC gravy wiped off it (if you carry your gear in a tail bag like I do). I have a very small kit with just a fw items......and no back board or EMT. I do carry a survival blanket though. It's one you can pick up at any Big 5 or cheapo sprting good store. It's folded and sealed and is about as big as a large deck of cards in it's package and they work decent for treating for shock. A hasty pressure dressing is as close as a t-shirt if worse comes to worse. A rolled up glove tied on top of a t-shirt pressure dressing over a "bleeder" works decent as a 2nd attempt at stopping the bleeder. You breathing will help alot toward not throwing up after you administer 1st Aid (don't panic and hold your breath....it happens).
 

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Good ideas,Martin.Thanks for the help in planning my own kit.Just trying to keep compact since we have a limited amount of space.(I think the EMT would suffocate if I crammed them into the saddlebag.):D
 

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Going back to the tourniquet: I am in the Army and have received new first aid training yearly for the past several years because of the changes to procedures that have come about because of the current conflicts. For the first 8 or 9 years of my service, the tourniquet was a last case resort. Not any more. It is now an early form of treatment. All soldiers are issued a tourniquet prior to deployment and some units require the carry of more than one(mine did). Tourniquets were seen as an item the would cause the loss of limb if used, but after reviewing how long a limb is cut off from it's blood supply during surgery(up to 7 or 8 hours) that belief is now old school thinking. In my opinion, and that of the US Armed Forces, if the bleeding is a continuous bright red stream, apply a tourniquet on the wound to keep the victim from bleeding out.

Cartoonhead mentioned the Israeli bandage. Also known as a Moulin bandage. Another great item. This beats most any other type of pressure dressing you could use.

Easy to use and small to carry is a nasal pharangeal airway. This is a small tube inserted into the nose that passes down the esophogus to provide a clear airway, say for someone who wasn't wearing a helmet and had their face smashed up.

I recently moved to Germany and all cars/trucks, etc are required to have a first aid kit and all drivers are required to have first aid training prior to getting their driver's license. This is actually one law I completely agree with. I have a 2010 Z1000 with enough "trunk" space for 3 pieces of paper. I have not added a first aid kit to my regularly carried items, but I have 2 Army issued Improved First Aid Kits just sitting in a box at the house. I think it is time to pull them both out and tote them with me when I ride. Good little kits.

If you are interested in the Red Cross CPR/1st aid/AED training, talk to your employer about it and see if they will arrange for your entire workforce to be trained. If they don't bite off on it, just go here http://www.redcross.org/ and sign up for a class yourself. Every little bit of training helps. I have done the Red Cross training, Army first aid taught in basic training and the Combat Livesaver Course which teaches a little bit more in depth stuff than basic first aid. I feel much more confident with my abilities every time I recertify or get new training.
 

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I too was suprised to see the tourniquet come back. My entire military career it was all but a no-no. Last year I went through 1st Responder (EMR) training and there it was. It's well covered and there's still alot of apprehension to actually use it but it's not the no-no anymore.
 
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