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Discussion Starter #1
There are zero tools in the united states that fit any Vulcan apparently and its on backorder. Backorder timeframe is unknown. Another win for Kawi.

The Motion Pro one for Kawasakis only works for dirt bike bearing sizes. The adjustable ones on the internet looked real ghetto. So here I sit with a loose bearing.

I don't want to use the screwdriver method, I want to torque it to spec for a change. And the day I let a pimpled dealers tech touch my bike again is the day I'm a cripple, had way too many bad experiences. Plus they want to charge $150. Um no. Tool is $34, labor is MAYBE an hour if I go slow and focus on drinking beer more than wrenching.

Just wanted to vent.
 

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Will they rent the tool? offer them $30 bucks for a tool rental and give them your ID. that is like free money.
 

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I've always done the final bearing preload adjustment with a long punch and a hammer. Never had good luck torquing the nut(s) even when I had the official tool. You tighten the nuts until the bearings are preloaded sufficiently to give "enough" drag turning the forks. The only proceedure I've ever seen for realistically doing this was BMW's where you use a "fish scale" to measure the force required to turn the forks against the bearing drag. Usually preload gets gauged by letting the forks (with the front tire of the bike off the ground) fall to the side and adjusting based on how fast the forks fall and how much they "bounce" after hitting the steering stop.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This seems like something that needs to be done regularly to keep it within spec, had to do it at 2k miles and now 10k too. So I'd rather own it.

Its still rideable just a bit annoying and I don't want it to go on too long or else risk damaging the bearing races. I figure with how much riding is left before the snow falls I'll just steal the wifes bike if I need my fix.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've always done the final bearing preload adjustment with a long punch and a hammer. Never had good luck torquing the nut(s) even when I had the official tool. You tighten the nuts until the bearings are preloaded sufficiently to give "enough" drag turning the forks. The only proceedure I've ever seen for realistically doing this was BMW's where you use a "fish scale" to measure the force required to turn the forks against the bearing drag. Usually preload gets gauged by letting the forks (with the front tire of the bike off the ground) fall to the side and adjusting based on how fast the forks fall and how much they "bounce" after hitting the steering stop.
The bounce is how I'll verify it but I prefer a stiffer steering. I also may take the time to grease the bearings so I'll probably drop the front wheel and lower the forks enough to pack some grease in there and then button it all up.
 

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This seems like something that needs to be done regularly to keep it within spec, had to do it at 2k miles and now 10k too. So I'd rather own it.

Its still rideable just a bit annoying and I don't want it to go on too long or else risk damaging the bearing races.
what are the symptoms you're experiencing?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There's a thud when I go over a bump, it used to be only large bumps but now its all of them. The new place I'm at has a massive curb type drainage channel along all the roads. When I went down that the other day I felt the front end move a bit so I know its loose. I went over every nut and bolt on the front end and everything else is fine. Like I said its the same as around 2k miles and i tightened it a bit and everything was fine for 8k miles.
 

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If they're loose enough to clunk like that (if the bearings are what's clunking) I'd be tightening the bearings instead of waiting for the special tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Its not being ridden right now. Finished my headlight install the other day, installed my aux fuse panel yesterday, wired up my gerbing gear today. Now working on the fairing brackets as time permits. I got plenty to keep busy until the tool arrives. If a day becomes too awesome to pass up I'll use the hammer method but I really don't want to again.
 

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I saw on the web where a guy picked up the spanner wrench at home depot for use under a sink, cheap and it works he said.

Im working on head bearings right now on my classic, the steering was getting weird.
 

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steering

I cant see what keeps the stem nut from moving around.
Could somebody clue me in.

....claw washer then the triple clamp on top, what am I missing ?
 

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There's the claw washer that in theory is supposed to hold the stem nut. It doesn't. The triple clamp sits on the stem nut and tightening the upper stem nut down on the triple clamp locks the stem nut under the triple clamp. It's like double nutting with a washer (in this case the triple clamp) between the nuts. Tightening the upper nut also drives you nuts because it adds to the bearing preload by taking up the nut/stem thread clearance after you've carefully adjusted the preload, so you get to start over. Part of the reason "torquing" the stem nut doesn't work.
 
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