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Discussion Starter #1
I know a lot of people won't agree with this usually but I saw that the new Ninja 1000 has that "low power" mode that only uses 70% of it's power. I was originally thinking to start on a 650 ABS but if this bike really has an option to only use 70% of 1000 (700), I was considering going this route instead.

I'm not experienced with motorcycles but I've been on ATVs and whatnot so when I purchase either one of my considerations, I will be in a parking lot and/or my super little neighborhood with little to no traffic for quite awhile before I even try doing anything on the road just to hopefully get a feel for the bike.

I realize that doesn't give me any "real life" experience but I don't plan on doing anything reckless at all on this thing. I value my life and truthfully feel as if I'd be okay on a Ninja 1000 ABS, but I'd like input from other people as well to possibly give me some tips or really anything to set me straight.
 

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Uh, no.

Starting out on what is basically an upright, 500+ lb., 1000cc superbike is most definitely NOT the correct entrance point into motorcycling. Do yourself a favor- go find an MSF course & learn the basics first. Tool around on one of those smaller bikes and learn the ropes a bit before you hurt yourself or someone else. Then after you've passed that course, go shopping on craiglist and find yourself a small or middleweight beater bike that you can learn further on. Do that for 6 ms. to a year and then, if you haven't maimed/killed yourself or anyone else, shop around for the next size up, say a 750 or 800cc bike. Wash rinse, repeat for another year. Then MAYBE you'll be ready for the low power mode on the N1K.

Just my 2 cents.
Lee
 

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Please don't!

I don't know you or your skills, so obviously don't take this personally at all. But nobody should start on a 1000cc sportbike for their first motorcycle. Seriously.

People talk about a bike being able to "get away from you", and new riders just don't understand what that means. They think to themselves "I'll take it easy and be gentle on the throttle, no worries" ...then something like this happens even on an SV650:


There are issues like throttle control and clutch control, not to mention all the other tasks that go along with riding a motorcycle in traffic. (You can't compare ATV riding in any way).

Not only is the Ninja 1000 (even in "low power mode"), significantly more powerful than a SV650, it also weighs a lot more!

There are worse choices you could make for a first bike, but the Ninja 1000 is right there at the top of poor choices.

Here's my suggestions:

-Get trained. Don't "figure it out on your own", or "have a buddy teach you". Go take an MSF or other course.
-Get all the gear you can afford. (You'll want the protection).
-Get a smaller bike like a Ninja 300. If you're of the larger build folk, you can start on an SV650, but even that can get away from you.
-Get a used first bike. Your chances of dropping or crashing are pretty high when new to riding. Save yourself a lot of heartache and stress and get a used bike. (ABS has been around for several years now, and you can find used ABS models out there).
-Did I mention get real professional training? Yeah, seriously, 1 weekend course, and more worth your money than any motorcycle bling.

Honestly the fact that you say "I value my life and truthfully feel as if I'd be okay on a Ninja 1000 ABS", has me the most concerned that you have no concept of how easily a liter bike (even a detuned Ninja 1000), can get away from you as a new rider.
 

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Case in point. This guy isn't doing anything reckless, but happens to hit the front wheel off the road edge trying to avoid a speed bump, which probably made him grab the bars tighter to regain control, which made him accidentally twist the throttle, which made the bike suddenly accelerate, and as soon as the "whiskey throttle" starts, he's toast within 3 seconds:


Here's the quote from the youtube video description, so you can see that this simple little "parking lot crash" would have actually killed this guy were he not in an ambulance when his heart stopped:

This is the brief GoPro video summary of my near-death experience when poor road conditions hurtled my 2014 Ninja 1000 SX through an iron gate type fence, and then a 6" (about 14cm) and I landed 5 meters away on a wooden plank overhanging a 1-2 meter deep canal. I came very close to drowning in a canal since I was unconscious. I had to have my jeans cut-off me since my femur had ripped through my jeans. On the way to the hospital my heart stopped 2 times and was re-started with CPR and epinephrine.

I was in ICU with acute renal failure for 11 days and am still receiving Hemodialysis even though I was released from Kasemrad Hospital, Bangkok after 15 days. I am unable to walk due to the broken femur and my renal system may take months or longer to recover.


See even his description of the event, makes it sound like he may have been a newer rider. He says the cause of this was "poor road conditions", not acknowledging that it was his throttle inputs that caused the crash. An experienced rider would have just taken the speed bump most likely. Even if the experienced rider went around, he would know there's bad road there and cars that may suddenly start up and move, so he would be covering the clutch with the left hand, and likely the rear brake with the right foot. In the exact same scenario, an experienced rider might have hit that road edge wrong and simply pulled the clutch in to keep from popping a wheelie, and/or hit the rear brake to keep from taking off, and likely both (if he actually made the poor choice to go over that broken surface in the first place).

Anyways... I'm glad you're reading up Too Cold, and asking forum members for opinions. I hope you listen, so we can have you as a part of our community for years to come. :)
 

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Case in point. This guy isn't doing anything reckless, but happens to hit the front wheel off the road edge trying to avoid a speed bump, which probably made him grab the bars tighter to regain control, which made him accidentally twist the throttle, which made the bike suddenly accelerate, and as soon as the "whiskey throttle" starts, he's toast:

+1
 

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Now, are you gonna be one of the guys that does it anyway, and ends up hurt or worse, or are you gonna be one of the very few that listen to more experienced riders, and have a long, enjoyable, lifetime of motorcycling? Good on you for asking, but you actually have to take the advice offered...
 

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Too Cold...agree with everyone's suggestions. The learning curve to riding on the street is pretty steep (to be safe). A 650 ninja has a ton of power and will give you time to aquire skills like braking, turning, throttle and clutch and handling a 470 bike. The bikes weight and slow speed handling/balance takes a lot of practice/miles to do well.

A Honda CBR500R or Ninja 300 are perfect entry points to. Less weight and power to keep you out of trouble. Even a 70% power mode, the N1K is a heavy, powerful monster that can get you in trouble quickly.

Best advice is get a small used bike to get and sharpen your skills on, then in a couple of years you'll be ready for a monster like the N1K.
 

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I've only got a few km's on mine, so it's still staying below 5 grand, and even in low power mode it'll still smoke the rear tire, so I wouldn't count on that to keep you safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I will be listening to you guys for the most part. I know people say to get a beater or used bike to start but I'm still thinking of a 2013 or 2014 Ninja 650 ABS. I do appreciate everyone's responses.
 

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I would suggest to get a smaller dual sport bike and learn riding off road. Knowing how to react when tires start to slide goes a long way to staying alive on the street. Then buy the street bike. Plus then you'll have 2 bikes!
 

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plus also the 1000 ninja on low power mode still has loads of power. its just restricting the top end mostly.
 

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a 650 would be fine if you have ridden a bike before but you better get frame sliders if you are buying new because you WILL drop the bike. One drop will cost you $500 or more unless you have some frame sliders. nothing is worse than having a new bike with scrapes and chunks missing on it to make it look like an old pos bike.
 

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Thanks for the responses guys.. I appreciate it. I was hoping that someone would talk some sense into me and you guys definitely helped.
And how about this:
Assuming that you are talking about buying a brand new bike, are you wealthy enough to take an additional financial hit of 1/3 to 1/2 of the initial price to FIX it when you drop it and break all of the pretty plastic body work ??

Regardless of the size and style, a new rider should NEVER buy a brand new bike for his first ride.......unless he IS independently wealthy, that is.
 

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The power modes are a terrible idea for motorcycles because they give the illusion of what your hoping for....turning a 1000cc bike into a 500cc bike. It does nto work, and never will.

Theres so much more to a motorcycle than its power. A smaller engine, lighter weight, and more subtle brakes come to mind. All of this stuff can be mastered by 99% of everyone, but wont come without practice. Even at 25% of a Ninja 1000's horsepower, its too much for someone without experience.

A safety course is a great idea. Notice during the course, no one is training people to ride on BMW s1000rr's with the power turned down.

The thing is, everyone who starts out on a big bike hopes they will be the exception to this rule..actually, they know they are or they would stop and consider an alternative.

The funny part is someone without experience does not even knwo what type of motorcycle they need, or want.

A new person could buy a Ninja 250, ride it for six months, then sell it for the same amount they paid for it. Or, the offroad bike. Anything would be better than a Ninja 1000. I'd even argue for the Harley since its low end power is manageable and the high torque helps with starts.

I hope you'll reconsider and come back, with your 2015 Ninja 1000.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yeah I'll definitely be getting sliders on it. And I noticed that the majority of people say that beginners WILL drop their bike... Any particular scenario where this happened for you guys or....? Like do people just forget to put the stand down or what? Doesn't seem like it's too difficult to not drop, in my opinion.... Now losing the bike while actually moving and it going on it's side, that's a little more understandable.. But how on Earth would someone just let their bike fall..?
 

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Even if you buy the 650, order a restrictor plate from Europe and install it. Why we don't have a tiered license structure over here is crazy IMO.

I am assuming you are paying cash, because financing a toy that you will devalue very fast as a new rider does not make sense at all.

If you want a sporty bike, buy an '06 - '08 Ninja 650. Preferably one that has been dropped and scratched up that you can pick up for cheap and sell for the same amount when you are ready to move up.

Remember, you are not buying a bike to impress the girls. That will only get you into trouble quicker. Good Luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for the advice, twowheeladdict! And yeah, definitely not for the girls lol. I've wanted one for quite awhile, just now able to finally get one.
 
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