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Discussion Starter #1
well lately i have been thinking of rejetting my bike. Unfortunatly i have not had much experance working on bikes, only simple bolt-on's. so my question is on a scale of one to 10 how hard would it be to re-jet the bike if time was no object. i'd like to say i did it myself but its not worth destroying my bike
 

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Jason, that is really a tough question to answer. It is really not that hard, but then, I have done it several times. The most difficult part for someone who has never done it before will probably getting the carbs in and out. There is no calibrating or anything like that, it is simple parts replacing--take something out and put something back--and if you are carefull, you don't have to resyncronize the carbs.
 

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The Commander
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Jason - Look through the step-by-step guide I posted on ZR-7.com. That will give you the detail of what's involved, so you can decide if you want to tackle it or not. When I did it, I hadn't ever worked on a motorcycle in my life, and I didn't find it difficult, just takes time. The guide is posted here on the Maintenance Tips page on ZR-7.com and is called "Holeshot Jet Kit Install".
 

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Discussion Starter #4
ok

I have read the holeshot artical and found it pretty informative. i plan in having the carbs resinked after its done anyway because i am putting in a K&N slip on and rejetting it. id like to get it all done at one time. with the exception of mabey having to take the white ring out or my intake i really dont want to have to go into it again till it needs a valve job. but like i read earlier today baby steps mabey i should do it one step at a time
 

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The Commander
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The K&N is just a drop-in filter replacement, so that only takes 5 minutes. The white end cap in the airbox is just attached with 2 screws, so that's a no-brainer too. The slip-on is not much more involved, just unscrew the bolts out of the old one, slip the new one on and bolt it back together. Rejetting is by far the most time consuming part of the process, since you have to remove the bank of carbs to do it. As long as you don't mind spending a few hours on it, there's nothing difficult at all about the process. It's just tedious work, so you need a lot of patience, particulary when reinstalling the carbs back on the bike.
 

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i never worked on a bike either and my 1st job was the jet kit. i would rate it a 6. the hardest part was getting the rubber boots back on. i took digital pic as i was taking the bike apart, good thing i need cause one of the vent tubs slid off withthe pics i found it very quickly. With the instuctions from this site it pretty easy
 

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Of course everyone may have figured this out already, but I found it easier to shove the boots through the airbox holes onto the carb intakes rather than to try to slide them in from the sides. If you start from the inside pair and then do the outside pair there is more room to work.

Also noticed that there was an alignment notch on the top of the boots that fit around a small nub on the airbox. Made me feel a lot better about getting the boots in correctly.

-=kent
 
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