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I gave someone a ride back home on the bike tonight, and all i can say is that i can not get comfortable with someone on the back of the bike. I can just feel the extra weight which prob is only 100 lbs max. The hardest part for me is taking turns right after a stop sign... i just feel like with the bike going slow and the extra weight it makes the bike unstable... Im perfectly fine once the bike gets up to speed and i can easily do corners at 40 mph, but the slow ones i am not comfortable making at all. ANy tricks or ideas that i can use or tell my passenger to do during these slow turns?
 

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ANy tricks or ideas that i can use or tell my passenger to do during these slow turns?
More gas/clutch let out than normal to compensate the additional load (obviously practice in moderation, have them look the direction of the turn and their body should do the rest, minimal movement while performing low speed manuevers.
 

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Have your passengers sit straight and not try to lean into turns.
I don't think you worded that properly, cause counter leaning in a turn is not good. All he should have the passenger do is look into the turn, and their body would naturally compensate the rest.
 

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Sitting straight with respect to the bike is good. You don't want them leaning into the turns or away from them, just staying neutral.

The best passengers are the ones with riding experience.
 

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Tip I learned the scary way: When you go to impress them with the awesome speed and power of the 650r, as well as your substantial riding skills, and so go and wack the throttle wide open, be aware that there is WAY more weight on the back of the bike and the front tire will come up VERY easily in the lower 2 gears!!
 

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You need to do a little research regarding riding with a passenger. Your passenger also needs to know how to be a passenger. There are a lot of resources. Do a google search.

Here are some to get you started:

http://www.motorcyclecruiser.com/streetsurvival/motorcycle_passenger/index.html

http://motorcyclebloggers.com/2008/03/25/pillion-recommendations/

http://www.helium.com/items/309018-how-to-be-a-safe-motorcycle-passenger

Remember that communication is key. I recommend you discuss this with any passenger you might take with you. This advice will help you avoid any embarrassing moments or worse when riding with a passenger.
 

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search my threads by clicking on my name. I did a small write up on the subject that contains info that myself and others have sworn by. I've gotten plenty compliments on it.

In short, have your passenger brace on your gas tank with their hands. Hell of a difference. After awhile, its like they aren't even their.
 

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Ive been riding two up all summer long and feel really good with some one on the back as far as riding, turning and stoping. All the machanics of driving feel great. But one thing, I can not get comfortable on the bike when riding two up. I don't feel her on the back. I tightend the shock up which helped with two up and single riding.. but still Its ackes and pains the whole way unless I take some of the shelf pain killers.

Im going to be doing a new seat here soon I hope. Other than that its a great bike for two up.. just needs new seat.

Also, when we do ride two up and when I am slowing down she slides forward and thats tough for her.

ugh ahah
 

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Also, when we do ride two up and when I am slowing down she slides forward and thats tough for her.
Some body on here gave a remedy for that. When slowing down, have her put one or two hands on your gas tank to brace herself and stop from sliding into you.
 

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When I first rode two ups, I practiced A LOT of right hand turns. I will normally stop about 2-3 feet behind the white line. This allows me approximately 5-7 feet total to get the bike rolling before I make the turn. That's 2-3 feet behind the white stop line plus 3-4 feet in front of the white stop line to make my turn. With practice, you should be able to make the turn in a few hours without problems. With more ride time, you'll eventually be able to stop right at the white line and make the turn using only the 3-4 feet in front of the white stop line.

Practice, practice, practice is pretty much my advice. Another practice you may want to undertake is stopping at a steep incline with a passenger. I had actually witness two incidents near my home where the operator and passenger fell. Now I don't know what cause it but my guess would be that the riders were inexperienced with the steep incline and rolling on the throttle from the stop light.
 

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I gave someone a ride back home on the bike tonight, and all i can say is that i can not get comfortable with someone on the back of the bike. I can just feel the extra weight which prob is only 100 lbs max. The hardest part for me is taking turns right after a stop sign... i just feel like with the bike going slow and the extra weight it makes the bike unstable... Im perfectly fine once the bike gets up to speed and i can easily do corners at 40 mph, but the slow ones i am not comfortable making at all. ANy tricks or ideas that i can use or tell my passenger to do during these slow turns?
Here's the important question: did you take her to YOUR house, or HER house??:threadjac
 

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Some body on here gave a remedy for that. When slowing down, have her put one or two hands on your gas tank to brace herself and stop from sliding into you.
Grab handles are even better - she doesn't have to wrap her arms around you and bonk your helmet with hers. The boobie-on-back might be nice once, but it gets old fast.

It's weak as hell that the bike doesn't come with them stock.

A topcase also helps with passenger (and rider) comfort - he/she can lean back and not crowd you as much.

Here's the important question: did you take her to YOUR house, or HER house??:threadjac
He didn't say 'her,' he said 'someone.' :~
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for all the advice, i will have to try it all out. and to let you know, this someone was a girl. you wont be seeing a guy ever on the back of my bike.
 

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Hey, it's not ghey as long as the helmets don't touch.
bwhahaaha!! That's great!



back to topic though, it's going to have an entire different feel. You're carrying more weight, and not only more weight, but more weight that can shift on its own. Just tell your squeeze to look over your shoulder in the direction of the turn. You'll be surprised at how much it helps.

by the way:

pics of the gal or GTFO! :D
 

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Some body on here gave a remedy for that. When slowing down, have her put one or two hands on your gas tank to brace herself and stop from sliding into you.
Thats always the game plan but a pain for her to do. She slides forward rather easily and if I have to stop quicker than usual she will do that.. Im going to put on the hand bars from ther er6n for her.
 

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Grab handles are even better - she doesn't have to wrap her arms around you and bonk your helmet with hers. The boobie-on-back might be nice once, but it gets old fast.

It's weak as hell that the bike doesn't come with them stock.

A topcase also helps with passenger (and rider) comfort - he/she can lean back and not crowd you as much.



He didn't say 'her,' he said 'someone.' :~
+1

The bike probably doesn't come with passenger grab rails because it is not required here in the states. But they do have that "rid'em bronco" strap to hold onto. ;)

You can take the advanced MSF course with your passenger. That way you both learn to deal with riding two up.
 

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I don't think you worded that properly, cause counter leaning in a turn is not good. All he should have the passenger do is look into the turn, and their body would naturally compensate the rest.
No, I worded it properly. Your passenger should not be leaning into turns. I don't know where you learned this, but its not safe or correct. They should sit straight, and not try to help you turn the bike, thats a fast way to low side. I don't mean the passenger can't look around, but they should not be trying to lean the bike with you.
 

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No, I worded it properly. Your passenger should not be leaning into turns. I don't know where you learned this, but its not safe or correct. They should sit straight, and not try to help you turn the bike, thats a fast way to low side. I don't mean the passenger can't look around, but they should not be trying to lean the bike with you.
Now not only are you wording things improperly but your having trouble reading too. I never said they should be conscientiously leaning into turns w/ you. I said "All he should have the passenger do is look into the turn, and their body would naturally compensate the rest." -the great Nicklovin. Meaning that they should not be thinking about or attempting to lean into a turn, they SHOULD be looking into the direction of the turn in which you are going and w/e degree of change is naturally called for as a result of that action their body will compensate.
 
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