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Thanks for sharing. Sucks you damaged the bike, but at least you made out better!
 

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Sorry to see. Glad you're ok for the most part. It happens. Rolling over rocks is unsettling no doubt especially in turns. Guy stopped was stupid for stopping there. Basically shouldve had a "kick me" sign taped to his back.

In addition to your target fixation diagnosis, please take this as trying to help, you were riding above your limits.
 

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Thanks for sharing. Glad you were not badly hurt. Hopefully you learn something from this experience. Initially, it looks like you are placing the blame on the rocks, the other rider, etc. when the blame falls squarely on you and riding beyond your skill level. Live and learn.
 

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As a new rider we are afraid we won't hold on the turn but letting off the gas and leaning with counter steer would have pulled you out. It looks like you started to drift out and were not able to get back to the center of the road. Let off the gas and you will feel the control again. PS do not put the brakes on in the turn though, this will cause you to possibly loose traction and slide out.
 

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USMC if you didn't attend MSF you should do so. If you did, review the booklet and study it. As well as instincts serve us in our daily lives, in motorcycling our instincts are deadly. Ingrain and practice safety techniques taught by MSF and in the booklet. Training must be ever present and ready to instantaneously override instinct when things get hot.

Anyone that rides a sport bike is going to get into hot water once in a while. That's the proverbial moment of truth. What transpires the next few seconds could affect the rest of your life. Panic and hesitation will seal your fate. Training will save you or at least give you the absolute best chance possible. I've been in some hot **** before brother, sometimes you just got to grit your teeth and push them bars harder. It's either that, run off the road, run into an oncoming car. You react out of panic or fear, slam on them brakes, stand that bike up, all those things your instincts screams at 130db for you to do and it'll get you killed.

Training Training Training, Practice Practice Practice.
 

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Having been in a situation like this myself a few years ago and 15k miles earlier, I know exactly what you are going through. The gear helps. What i found myself wondering is what if this? What if that? How the hell did I do this or that? One thing I remembered which i credit for still being here is what I learned out of the MSF class was LOOK where you want to go. In watching your video the first time, I did not see the guy sitting on the road in on the first pass through the video because I was watching the line/rider in front of you. I had no clue he was there till apex of the turn. It appears you saw him sooner and didn't keep on your line. I agree you went in hot but the bike could have pulled you right through it with the right line even at that speed. The counter-steering video posted earlier helps a lot. It opened my eyes and I wished they went over it in class. In time you will get better and you will look back and laugh knowing this won't happen again due to your mistake as you will be better prepared for it next time.

Get back on the horse....
 

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Target fixation, maybe. Panic is what I saw, you froze at the controls, no turning and no braking inputs. You had plenty of time and room to stop and or turn. You didn't look where you needed to go to escape you looked yourself into the wreck. My opinion. You go where you look, when you look through the turn you go through the turn.
Also I think you may have too much motorcycle for you're experience /talent level. I personally started out with a Honda S90 as my first street motorcycle then a Yamaha 125 Street twin, then a 305 Honda Superhawk. My point is start slow learn the craft crawl, creep, walk, run. Know you're limits. Oh and limit riding with buddies. Unless y'all show a Huge amount of self control it's best to learn alone.
 

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Target fixation, maybe. Panic is what I saw, you froze at the controls, no turning and no braking inputs. You had plenty of time and room to stop and or turn. You didn't look where you needed to go to escape you looked yourself into the wreck. My opinion. You go where you look, when you look through the turn you go through the turn.
Also I think you may have too much motorcycle for you're experience /talent level. I personally started out with a Honda S90 as my first street motorcycle then a Yamaha 125 Street twin, then a 305 Honda Superhawk. My point is start slow learn the craft crawl, creep, walk, run. Know you're limits. Oh and limit riding with buddies. Unless y'all show a Huge amount of self control it's best to learn alone.
I disagree this was too much bike. 40 mph is not indicative of too much bike. He could have a moped and do 40. If he'd been doing 80 mph I might agree with that assessment. A few of us said above skill limits. Here why I said this. For one, he's trying to catch and keep up with other riders. For two, he was over concerned with rocks in the road and the only alternative he had was to let the rocks force him to change his line.

More experienced riders in front of him didn't seem to have problems with the rocks. Yes, hitting quarter sized rocks is unsettling but it takes experience to know when rocks will wreck you and when they won't. The rocks are unsettling? Well there's a few options other than the rocks basically forcing you off the road. Slow down? Stop, turn around and ride somewhere else? An experienced, good rider will be constantly assessing their situation, even if it seems like they're just riding along la-di-dah. An experienced poor rider will just be riding along la-di-dah, these are the people that forget they're invisible for example. An inexperienced rider ends their day stuffed into the side of a mountain because rocks forced them off the road.

I agree get back on that horse. But that's with an entirely different mindset. Otherwise I'd say motorcycles, and probably anything to do with speed or performance, aren't for this person. Poor decision making, failure to commit, failure to recognize and adapt to conditions, these are all the most basic principles of motorcycling and I would guess this rider did not go through an MSF course and if they did then they had the mindset that all this safety stuff is for those other losers.
 

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That's the trouble with putting yourself out there when you post a video, you're going to get those comments you don't want, need or like. *shrug*

Just shake it off and try to take it as constructive criticism. Some is meant to help, some is just folks trolling and hating. Regardless of why, you crashed, and that fact's not going to change.

In the end, what matters is you survived, not what you did or didn't do wrong.

And to your original post, yes it's good you had some gear on or it could have been much worse.
 

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Thank you! THIS is an intelligent response! haha. I will definitely shake it off, and yes Im glad it wasnt worse. I came from the dirt at an early age, always wore full gear, still doing the same thing. I smacked my head pretty hard that day, and crushed my shoulder. Gear definitely helped!
Some of the banter comes from us old men who have nothing better to do than create what we consider a humorous response and it turns out to appear as an insult. If we were face to face you would be able to interpret the humor for what it is, well meaning sarcasm. Think of how you and your Jarhead friends talked to each other. If it was like when I was in the crotch we were not gentle. If we would have talked nice to each other our fellow jarheads would have beat the crap out of us.

Vic.Thing is a perfect example. He has a great sarcastic sense of humor and I love reading his posts. But many, for no reason that I see, take exception to his humor. Life would be very boring to me if not for people like him. Cheers and Semper Fi.
 

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Most gear reports are focused on the gear. and injuries. Maybe you shouldn't have posted the video, especially one showing us how rocks made you drive off the road. Probably just should've posted some pics of your gear, injuries, and described the accident conditions. That's what most gear reports are.

Good luck. I won't look forward to your next accident video, but I won't be surprised if it doesn't happen to long from now.
 
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