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I'm running into fitment problems with Vortex clip-ons and the OEM MC fitting to my likings. Anyone switch to other OEM or aftermarket master cylinders?
I'm not so sure, lets say, a Kaw ZX6R MC bolts on with the original brake lines.

Any one have any insight?
 

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I've been using an OEM MC off a 2006 GSXR 750 for over three years now. Never had an issue with my Woodcraft clip-ons, nor the set of Driven clip-ons I use now with my front end swap.
 

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Did you literally just swap them over? What difference does it make? Im looking for a less spongy feeling on the brakes. Ive already gone to braided lines.
 

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Even when I had my stock MC with braided lines, I didn't have any sponginess. That comes strictly from air entrapped in the system; make sure to do a good bleed and your problem will go away.

Yes, I literally took the MC off my roommates bike, and put it on mine. The only difference is the fact that it is a radial MC, and the OEM 650R is not. All this has to do with, is the angle at which the plunger actuates the brake fluid internally on the MC, so there is no "performance" gain. The only reason I did this was because my stock MC was damaged in a high-side at the track, and my roommates MC was free.
 

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If it was a bigger bore than the stock one then would it not be pushing through more fluid, therefore meaning less input was needed for braking. Obviously you wouldnt want it to sensitive.
 

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No.

Just because the bore might be larger (or smaller) doesn't mean that you are pushing more fluid through. Actually even thinking about it like that is incorrect; if your braking system is bled properly and you have no air entrapment, the fluid in the system is actually barely moving at all, because all you're doing is transferring pressure. This is a basic principle of hydraulics / fluid dynamics, and is the main reason why changing from rubber brake lines to braided steel lines make the vast improvement in brake feel that they do. Changing the diameter of the input piston only changes the pressure applied to the output piston, so in theory yes, you might gain a little in terms of effort of brake pressure application, but in reality you won't notice a huge huge difference unless you changed to a ridiculously large MC. Changing the lines to braided lines will make a much more noticeable gain as far as brake feel is concerned.
 
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