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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've had my Scottoiler E-System for over 20,000 miles, including several multi-day trips and three Iron Butt rides. I thought I'd share some brief observations on it's operation.

But first, thank-you to the folks who put instructions for installing the Scottoilers on the forum, including pictures and videos, and those who discussed the oilers. That was very appreciated in helping me make up my mind to try this gizmo. There are many helpful threads on Scottoilers; 11 pages show up on a search for "Scottoiler," so I won't post links.

Here's a brief rundown of my experiences:

I did a trial run of about 200 miles right after installation, and discovered a kink in the feeder line which hadn't been there at installation. Unkinking and a few extra zip-ties permanently fixed that problem. So, don't just install it and ride off for a week-long trip the next day.

One thing I found is that the tip of the emitter can get clogged from road grime. The display doesn't include any sort of error warning, but when riding a whole day I noticed that the oil level display had not gone down. So when I next stopped, I noticed that the chain seemed dry and the reservoir was still full. A quick look-over showed a glob on the emitter tip, which I cleared. And the oil flowed well when I set the control to prime, and there were no further troubles that trip. Now I just wipe the tip with a gas station towel when I start out in the morning, and haven't had a repeat of that trouble.

Also, twice the memory has gone out while on a trip. It just needs reprogramming, but it was disconcerting to look at the display and surprisingly see no oil indicated in the reservoir. The programming had been lost, and it reset to factory settings, which included zeroing out the oil level. This may have been due to having some age on my battery, and the voltage becoming irregular under some conditions (see comment below).

And concerning programming, I've found that one drop every 60 seconds is sufficient. There is a slight amount of fling that dirties my Little Red Ninja, but I figure err on the side of more rather than less. I've also increased the sensitivity setting by one level after a period of in-town commuting seemed to produce a drier than desired chain. Perhaps I wouldn't have needed to do this if I was only highway riding.

I also like being able to increase the flow while on the move--by reducing the number of seconds between drops. It does take one or two short glances down to the display, but I think this is good for the chain when getting onto wet or dusty roads. And it's just as easy to reset when the wet or the dust go away.

And the oil really does migrate from the emitter side to the other side of the chain. It also migrates to the entire underside of the chain guard, the wheel, and small amounts on my saddle bags, and even my license plate (must be some sort of wind vortex thing).

If you have any additional comments, observations, or tricks, please feel free to add them here for future researchers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I have a 2007 First Generation, so my installation may differ slightly from newer models.

I attached the controller to the left bar controls, so I'd be able to operate it with my clutch hand while moving. I slightly bent the attachment bar to angle the screen upward.

Cyclocomputer Auto part Technology Electronic device Dive computer


I attached the pump/reservoir unit on the left side. The location was easy to snake the controller's wires under the front fairing and secure with zip-ties, and also to snake the power wires to the battery. The pump was attached with zip-ties. I twist the pump toward me in order to fill it, and simply twist it back in when riding.

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There was enough of an existing gap to snake the breather tube up and under the seat.

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The swingarm has an attachment point for a frame slider or lift bobbin, which makes a great attachment point for the emitter. The supplied bolt had the wrong threading, so I bought one at a hardware store.

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Lastly, I snaked the oil feeder tube from the pump to the emitter, securing with more zip-ties and cutting to length.

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One additional observation: I think that I can easily get 2000 miles on a full reservoir. On longer trips, I pack a small filler bottle of oil in a heavy-duty ziplock bag and fill the reservoir up when on the last quarter. The filler bottle has never leaked into the ziplock, but the ziplock also keeps the pull-off cap from snagging on other stuff in my bags and possibly opening.
 

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I have a 2007 First Generation, so my installation may differ slightly from newer models.

Awesome, thanks!

Do you think it'd be fine to mount the controller under the seat and not on the bars/cockpit? It would mean not being able to adjust on the fly (no biggie) but once you get your flow rate sorted surely you don't need to adjust it much. Just check the level every now and then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I think the controller could be hidden under the seat, but you may lose the early warning when something goes amiss as described above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I added this to a thread on chain maintenance, but I thought it would fit here as it relates to the Scottoiler and I was hoping to collect relevant information in just one thread:

But perhaps this would be a good thread to mention that automatic chain oiler fans still need to clean and lube their chains. The oil that flings off the chain will take some of the dirt with it, but the chain still collects dirt. I hold off on this until I give my Old Girl a thorough bath.

And the oilers only work to top off the oil on the chain, so after cleaning, the chain should be lubed. This is like how your furnace doesn't ever heat the whole house from the outside temp up, but only makes up the little bit of heat lost since the last time it was running. Once the chain is clean, it has almost no lube, and the oiler is only designed to add a little lube over time instead of thoroughly lubing a dry chain.

The lube oil should be compatible with the oil used on the chain oiler, that is, not a spray which sets up with a waxy non-fling coating. The coating may cause the oil added by the automatic oiler to fling off before it can soak into the chain.

I can go over 2000 miles before the oiler needs to be refilled, which only takes about a minute and so is great on the road. Otherwise, I'd have to stop & lube the chain once or twice a day on long trips. I seem to be getting very good life out of my chain & sprockets (44,300 miles on originals, & not worn out yet) due to the constant lubrication as opposed to running them wet and dry. And I only do a cleaning about every 3 to 4 thousand miles.
 

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Nice writeup Baxter.

I didn't have any issues with my Scott eOiler except when, after 6 months or so, the display started to reset itself as you described. It's such a "set it and forget it" device that I didn't notice until I had a dry chain one day. I re-checked all the wiring and connectors to the battery. It reached the point a few months later where it was resetting itself on average about once every couple of weeks. It would go a month fine, reset, then reset a week later. I finally went on the Scottoiler forum and asked if anyone else had this issue. I got a "stock" reply with a checklist of things to look for and replied I'd done all that.

I received an email from the US Distributer a couple days later asking for an address to ship a new unit to! A week later I had one in hand with a return shipping label for the old one. He sent me a note saying the lab would want to dissect the old unit to find out why it was failing. For me, no more problems a year and a half later.

One thing to look out for is the oiler will reset itself if the voltage drops below 10.5V or so. With a weak battery this can happen when starting the bike even though the bike does start. I have a voltmeter on my bike so I know it doesn't happen. Other than that, it's most often a loose connection or broken wire in the cable.

My takeaway was that Scottoiler is a great company that stands behind their products. It took a while to get the minimum needed setting and I wasn't thrilled with the "fling" but it did the job it was supposed to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Nice writeup Baxter.

IOne thing to look out for is the oiler will reset itself if the voltage drops below 10.5V or so. With a weak battery this can happen when starting the bike even though the bike does start. I have a voltmeter on my bike so I know it doesn't happen. Other than that, it's most often a loose connection or broken wire in the cable.

I think it was my "olde" battery. The Old Girl still started alright, but the original battery was about 9 years old when I decided to replace it for peace of mind. This problem hasn't recurred with the new battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I received an email from the US Distributer a couple days later asking for an address to ship a new unit to! A week later I had one in hand with a return shipping label for the old one. He sent me a note saying the lab would want to dissect the old unit to find out why it was failing. For me, no more problems a year and a half later.

Excellent! If only more companies would be so proactive with their products and reputation.
 

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My e-system v2 worked for about 8000 miles.
Really disappointed to be honest. The wires broke and frayed where they come out of the pump.

I contacted scottoiler and after several emails, telling me the warranty was up, me being miffed that although it's a few years old, it's not even lasted 8000 miles and not 100% sure the pump is the cause. They agreed to look at it and test it.

They've tested it and confirmed that it's actually the display (control until, that's faulty and can't be repaired, although the wires that broke on the pump is not going to last either.

Anyhow been offered the choice of having faulty unit returned, or can buy the new v3 (ha, I don't think so)

The v2 control was much better and simple.
The v3 doesn't auto calibrate, you have to guess we they it's matched right to your engine, it doesn't display the number of 'drops per seconds' as a number, it has lots of bars you need guess how many bars equate to number of seconds. The oil fill level is now in fifths instead of quarters.

Anyhow, regardless, It may make the chain last longer and auto oil it, but at nearly £300, and only lasting approx 8000 miles. It's cheaper to just put the cash towards a new chain sooner. I definitely can't recommend scottoiler at this moment in time.
 
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