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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend of mine is interested in buying a Ducati Monster. I have to admit that the monster is a sweet looking bike and handles amazing. But I'm worried about the maintenance costs. Is it true that parts are much more expensive and mechanic's labor time is much higher? I'm not sure how to advise her. Any input is appreciated. :confuse:
 

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well the parts can often cost alot more, my friend had a BMW r100gs and the costs were crippeling him so he got rid of it, but that could just be BMW.
it might be worth comparing the cost of parts from a ducati to a zr-7 ;)
but i wouldnt think that machanics labor would be higher unless its a really weird bike, like KTM's often have oil filled frames which can be a pain, and they tend to be very highly strung
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
well the parts can often cost alot more, my friend had a BMW r100gs and the costs were crippeling him so he got rid of it, but that could just be BMW.
it might be worth comparing the cost of parts from a ducati to a zr-7 ;)
but i wouldnt think that machanics labor would be higher unless its a really weird bike, like KTM's often have oil filled frames which can be a pain, and they tend to be very highly strung
I've often heard the same thing said about BMWs.
I guess another thing that has to be figured in is reliability. (how often is the bike in the shop?)
 

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Duc's have more scheduled maintenance than Japanese 4-bangers and their rates are about 15% higher. More cost of parts as well.
 

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The Desmodromic valve adjustments are very expensive. IIRC, my full services (which included valve inspection/adjustment) were $1200 @ 600, 6000, 12,000, 18,000, etc. 2 Valve motors are a little cheaper.
 

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The newer ducatis dont require the amount of maintenance the older ones do. They are also as reliable as the japenese bikes now. But service work is more expensive and so are parts. But if your friend is capable of doing everything himself outside of valve adjustments its not so bad. The monster i think is every 6k for a valve clearance. That would be the only thing on basic maintenance that i wouldn't do. And if i can do everything else, trust me when i say your friend can as well.

Also at my triumph dealership they charge 600 for the 6k on the ducati and the 12k on the triumphs. If you do everything but the valve checks its almost half that.

Maintenance schedule for a monster
http://www.ducatimonster.org/faq/faq_service_intervals.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The newer ducatis dont require the amount of maintenance the older ones do. They are also as reliable as the japenese bikes now. But service work is more expensive and so are parts. But if your friend is capable of doing everything himself outside of valve adjustments its not so bad. The monster i think is every 6k for a valve clearance. That would be the only thing on basic maintenance that i wouldn't do. And if i can do everything else, trust me when i say your friend can as well.

Also at my triumph dealership they charge 600 for the 6k on the ducati and the 12k on the triumphs. If you do everything but the valve checks its almost half that.

Maintenance schedule for a monster
http://www.ducatimonster.org/faq/faq_service_intervals.html
Good to know that they are reliable and not maintenance intensive.
 

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Good to know that they are reliable and not maintenance intensive.
Where did you get that?

My personal experience with Ducati's (8,000 miles on 900 Super Sport (air cooled 2 valve), 12,000 miles on a 748 (liquid cooled 4 valve), plus three friends with Ducati's) is that they ARE more maintenance intension (the newer being less so than the older models, as C.C. said) than Japanese bikes.

My advice to people asking about Ducati's is generally "If you have to ask about the maintenance, Ducati's are NOT for you", meaning either the cost is gonna be unfavorable to you and/or you don't already have the mechanical know-how to do it yourself. Don't get me wrong I love Ducati's (and wish I were in the financial position to have a garage full of them) however they DO require more of a "commitment" than Japanese bikes, and as such really aren't for everyone.

My old boss was insulted when I told him this. But I knew he wasn't really prompt when it comes to vehicle maintenance. He ended up getting a Honda Superhawk, which chugged along dutifully for many, many miles with misadjusted cables, dirty fluids, sloppy un-lubed chain, underinflated tires and no valve adjustments. I know a Ducati would have died long before the Superhawk ever did.
 

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The newer ducatis dont require the amount of maintenance the older ones do. They are also as reliable as the japenese bikes now. But service work is more expensive and so are parts. But if your friend is capable of doing everything himself outside of valve adjustments its not so bad. The monster i think is every 6k for a valve clearance. That would be the only thing on basic maintenance that i wouldn't do. And if i can do everything else, trust me when i say your friend can as well.

Also at my triumph dealership they charge 600 for the 6k on the ducati and the 12k on the triumphs. If you do everything but the valve checks its almost half that.

Maintenance schedule for a monster
http://www.ducatimonster.org/faq/faq_service_intervals.html
How you liking the street triple? They have my interest...

I would go with Triumph if I bought a non-japanese bike, reliability has been good on their bikes...
 

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A friend of mine is interested in buying a Ducati Monster. I have to admit that the monster is a sweet looking bike and handles amazing. But I'm worried about the maintenance costs. Is it true that parts are much more expensive and mechanic's labor time is much higher? I'm not sure how to advise her. Any input is appreciated. :confuse:
Also, a little more info about which model she is looking at would be helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Where did you get that?

My personal experience with Ducati's (8,000 miles on 900 Super Sport (air cooled 2 valve), 12,000 miles on a 748 (liquid cooled 4 valve), plus three friends with Ducati's) is that they ARE more maintenance intension (the newer being less so than the older models, as C.C. said) than Japanese bikes.

My advice to people asking about Ducati's is generally "If you have to ask about the maintenance, Ducati's are NOT for you", meaning either the cost is gonna be unfavorable to you and/or you don't already have the mechanical know-how to do it yourself. Don't get me wrong I love Ducati's (and wish I were in the financial position to have a garage full of them) however they DO require more of a "commitment" than Japanese bikes, and as such really aren't for everyone.

My old boss was insulted when I told him this. But I knew he wasn't really prompt when it comes to vehicle maintenance. He ended up getting a Honda Superhawk, which chugged along dutifully for many, many miles with misadjusted cables, dirty fluids, sloppy un-lubed chain, underinflated tires and no valve adjustments. I know a Ducati would have died long before the Superhawk ever did.
Thanks for clearing that up.
It's great to have good honest opinions :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Also, a little more info about which model she is looking at would be helpful.
It'll probably be the smallest ducati monster (I think it is the 600 or 700).
She's a beginner rider so she's only interested (actually, smitten with) in the small ducati monster.
Not having owned a ducati ever, I really could not give her the pros and cons...
 

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The small air cooled 2 valve motors are the easier and cheaper ones to maintain. They really do have top notch components when compared to an SV650 or Ninja 650 (though the Japanese bikes are faster) which makes them very nice to ride. The parts can also be very expensive to replace in the case of an accident. I know back in the day the tanks were $1200, for just a plain solid colored tank.
 

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the new 11 degree engines are less maintenance intesive. this motor is found on the Diavel and Multistrada 1200. Valve adjustments are every 15k miles IIRC. Some duc dealers have "maintenance" plans that cost up front, but then included inthe packages are the big maintenance items. check first.

I believe that the monsters are still every 6k though. Duc is realizing that they are loosing market share due to these costs.
 

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The street triple is simply awesome. Most fun on a bike i have ever had. Brings a smile to my face every time i ride it. I have the standard version and not the r so i dont have the adjustable front end, but its set up well or a 170lb rider. The rear shock swaps out perfectly with an 07-08 cbr shock and since then handles great. Bike has never given me a problem. Some of them and the daytonas have faulty RRs, but that seems to be a common problem for many bikes. But 2 daytonas for me and 1 street triple and no rr problem yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The monster doesn't seem to cost all that much more in terms of initial purchase price but in terms of maintenance cost, it is quite a bit more.

Thanks for all the replies and great info. I think my friend can make a much more informed decision.
 

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What about maintenance for other euro bikes like Triumph, KTM, Moto Guzzi? How about Buell? Anybody with experience with these bikes?
 
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