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Boy Scout
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1,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Back in the Spring I had a major tune up at the local bike shop. Bike ran great after wards and rode it 2 or 3 times right after that. Unfortunatel she sat in the garage until a couple of weeks ago. I took a Sunday drive from Upstate South Carolina to Chattanooga, TN. for some BBQ :alcy: During the ride I had an "Idle" issue especially at lights, stop signs and just slowing down. When I would be in 1st Gear with clutch compressed the Idle speed would really jump up. If I would release the cluth just before it would engage(so I would not stall at light) the idle speed would go down.
My 1st thought was do I have an issue with my Throttle Cable?

2nd thought was since the bike had sat most of the summer "Evil Ethanol Gas" there is supposedly a 10% mixture with gas in my area. I know that can vary depending how long the gas may be sitting in the gasstation tanks.

Went down to the local bike shop and they were very helpful by listening to my issue and remember my bike from this past Spring" Appareantly they don't see too many ZR-7S's. The shop mgr. thinks that my issue is the dirty Carbs / Jets from Ethanol gas. His recomendation was to take the tank off and get into each Carb (one at a time) and check the jets and clean them. He said to be careful and make sure you mark where the throttle cable is for each one. I've also heard about putting Sea Foam in the tank and running it through the Carbs as well.

Any help on this issue. What do you all think the issue is? I will be taking my time and cleaning the Carbs myself. I think I read somwhere that a 1/4" tube is the size to drain the gas from the Carbs? Does this sound correct?

Thanks in advance for all suggestions and oppions on Ethanol Gas for now on I will be buying Ethanol "Free" gas from a local station I would rather pay .20 more and not have the issues. Also if I can't then I will be mixing Star*Tron Fueln Treatment in my tank. www.startron.com
 

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Johnny Blue Lightnin'
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12,140 Posts
I think you're right Ben. Before you go into the carbs try some Seafoam. It really works. I used it on my four wheeler after it sat for a few months and a few days later it was as good as new. A friend of mine is a small engine mechanic and he says the manufacturers recommend 89 octane or better gas because it causes less carb issues. It must have better additive packages. If you can get ethanol free go for it but if the bike is going to sit the best bet is to use fuel stabilizer and drain the carbs.
 

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I ran 10% ethanol for 53,000 miles without a single carb problem ... but then I did drain the carbs and used fuel stabilizer when stored for the winter. Pay the extra if you want, but the fuel isnt' the issue - it maintenance.
 

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Boy Scout
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1,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #4

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Boy Scout
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1,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Went to my local NAPA Parts Dealer and bought 2 Cans of the Sea Foam for $6.35 each I guess thats a good price? By the way wrote an e-mail to Sea Foam and below is the response / recommendation on what I should do. Will be following the process below this weekend and report the results back to you guys.

Ben

Just add Sea Foam to the fuel and in your case I would add 2 ounces of Sea Foam per gallon of fuel. After adding the Sea Foam run the bike for about 10 minutes making sure the Sea Foam and fuel mixture gets into the carbs. The let sit for a few days, in that time Sea Foam will dissolve any gum of varnish in your carb. Then after some soak time start the bike and take if for a ride. As the bike runs you will notice improved idle quality. Sea Foam is a pure petroleum blend and will dissolve any petroleum based deposits cleaning out your carb. Sea Foam will not affect of harm any component in the fuel system because Sea Foam contains no chemical additives.



Jim Davis

Sea Foam Sales Co.

Technical Service Manager

ASE Certified Automotive Technician
 

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Super Moderator
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3,329 Posts
Sea Foam

Ben, it was an ugly-ish winter up hear this past year (2009 - 10) and my poor ZR-7S sat outside, un-run, for more time than I care to admit.

When it finally dried up and I began to ride again (more) I found I had symptoms similar to those you describe. For the record, most of the gas in this area is 10% ethanol also. So, I tried Sea Foam. Used 1/2 a can per tank for two tanks. Seems to have helped. Has been running well since....

Good luck with yours.... I know it is irritating when you can finally get out for a ride and the bike doesn't want to play fair.....

Take Care friend...
 

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Boy Scout
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1,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Gump,
Thanx for the testimonial (if that's a word) I'm definitely looking forward to trying the "Foam" out. Boy if it works it will be the best thing since sliced bread :silly:
 

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I use stabil and start mine monthly through the winter...

As far as not riding for a couple weeks,I've found a good back road and a couple WOT bursts through most of the gears cures any idle problems fairly quickly...
 

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Johnny Blue Lightnin'
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12,140 Posts
I think you're right Ben. Before you go into the carbs try some Seafoam. It really works. I used it on my four wheeler after it sat for a few months and a few days later it was as good as new. A friend of mine is a small engine mechanic and he says the manufacturers recommend 89 octane or better gas because it causes less carb issues. It must have better additive packages. If you can get ethanol free go for it but if the bike is going to sit the best bet is to use fuel stabilizer and drain the carbs.
I was I a hurry when I typed this. What I meant to say was that they (the small engine manufacturers) say the 89 octane gas seems to cause less carb varnish issues after an engine has been sitting unused for a period of time compared to an engine that has been unused for a period of time with 87 octane in it.

I'm not sure I believe it either but thats what they say. I spend the extra few cents for my four wheeler, mower, generator, and snowblower gas now just in case.
 

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Boy Scout
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1,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I always use te 93 octane in the bike. The bike is babied more then anything in the garage. For now on the bike, lawnmower & all small engines in the garage will get Ethanol Free gas.
Don't worry Jon I knew what u meant.
 
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