RiderForums.com - Kawasaki Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to buy a bike, Looking at a Honda CBR250R or Ninja 250R. (I was told these are good bikes to start on) Also looking at different helmets, all seems like they are he same but I am unsure. If I could get some advice so I can put together a idea of what I need. I'm 5'11" so I think I will fit easily on a 250? and I live on Maui, Hawaii so I got to keep heat in mind. and I want to ride to enjoy it, not be one of those punks that go out and scare themselves off a bike. Any advice is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Roger M.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,327 Posts
My advice is to go spend some time sitting on each bike and figure out which one you find more comfortable and which one makes you want to turn around and admire it when you walk away from it.

The best advice I can give about helmets is find one that is comfortable enough that you will want to wear it everytime you ride. Helmets do come in different shapes, sizes, weights, and amount of ventilation. Check out webbikeworlds helmet reviews. When you try on helmets keep the one you think fits well on your head for 20 minutes or so so you can see if there are any pressure points.

I'm 5'11" and found the '04 Ninja 250 I had was very comfortable. On long rides it did start to feel a little cramped though. I would guess that you wouldn't be doing too many 200 mile rides where you live.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info. I really needed it. And the longest I could go is around 200 miles. That is driving the whole way around the island.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
563 Posts
My advise is to get a little bigger engine. I started riding at a late age of 45 on a Yamaha FZ1 which is a 1000cc bike and had no problems. I don't recommend that size bike for a beginner but I was given a good deal and took it. Today I ride a Ninja 1000. For you I would recommend the Ninja 650. This bike has better ergonomics for all around riding.

Some of these small bikes you mention are copies of the bigger track bikes. You get all the uncomfortable riding position issues like tired wrists and none of the power. Land vehicle Vehicle Motorcycle Motor vehicle Motorcycle fairing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,327 Posts
My advise is to get a little bigger engine. I started riding at a late age of 45 on a Yamaha FZ1 which is a 1000cc bike and had no problems. I don't recommend that size bike for a beginner but I was given a good deal and took it. Today I ride a Ninja 1000. For you I would recommend the Ninja 650. This bike has better ergonomics for all around riding.

Some of these small bikes you mention are copies of the bigger track bikes. You get all the uncomfortable riding position issues like tired wrists and none of the power. View attachment 59647

Have you ridding a Ninja 250? I bought a Ninja 250 after 20+ years of riding huge bikes. The Ninja 250 was a blast to ride on the tight twisty roads near where I live. Plenty of power to propel a 200lb ride with gear. The only time the guys on larger displacement bikes would pull away from me is when the speeds got illegal (and only on the straights) so it was nice to have an excuse not to ride at illegal speeds. Most riders don't even have the skills to get the max out of a 250, nevermind a 1000cc bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,056 Posts
My advise is to get a little bigger engine. I started riding at a late age of 45 on a Yamaha FZ1 which is a 1000cc bike and had no problems. I don't recommend that size bike for a beginner but I was given a good deal and took it. Today I ride a Ninja 1000. For you I would recommend the Ninja 650. This bike has better ergonomics for all around riding.

Some of these small bikes you mention are copies of the bigger track bikes. You get all the uncomfortable riding position issues like tired wrists and none of the power. View attachment 59647
Neither the ninja 250 or cbr 250 are copies of the 600 track bikes. Both have very upright seating positions with low peg positions. You can learn to ride on any size bike, but the risk is greater of going down on a larger bike. That simply is fact. Another fact is you learn proper skills quicker on a smaller bike then a larger bike.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top