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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
How to replace clutch springs on a Kawasaki Ninja 650r.


Parts you will need:
new clutch springs
clutch cover gasket
2 quarts of engine oil


Tools you will need:
17mm wrench
1/4" drive ratchet
10mm socket
8mm socket
4mm allen wrench
Pliers, normal size
Flat head screwdriver
Gasket scraper or razer blade
something to drain your engine oil into


Tools that make things much easier:
funnel
small torque wrench


Misc. not required:
rags
shop gloves


Random thoughts about the project:
I'm going to start out by talking about things not directly related to the installation. First, the new springs (made by Barnett) looked to be wound much tighter than the OEM springs, which is why I chose them. I immediately noticed the difference when riding. I had to change the way I let out the clutch during normal riding just to keep the bike from jerking too much. The feel at the clutch lever is also much improved; there is more "feeling" in the pull of the lever, whereas before, it felt very soft to me.



Let's get started.
Refer to fig.1
Take your 4mm allen wrench and remove the four bolts holding the lower fairing and frame cover in place. Using the flat head screwdriver, remove the three plastic clips from the bottom and front of the lower fairing. Remove the lower fairing by pulling towards you, then down. Remove the frame cover by pulling the bottom towards you to pop the bottom two retaining clips, and then pulling up to pop the remaining top clip. Drain all the oil from the engine, but leave the oil filter in place (unless you plan on replacing it also).

fig.1



Refer to fig.2-3
Remove the throttle adjustment cable from it's mount. It just slides right out. Place it out of the way, but do not let it slide behind the engine, as it is a pain to fish out. Removing the clutch cable was quite a job, for me at least. Here's how I did it: I removed the clutch lever assembly from the handlebars, turned the unit upside down, and removed the cable from the lever. Place the clutch lever assembly to the side. Much of the tension on the clutch release lever should now be gone. Take your pliers and get a good grip on the clutch cable right in front of the clutch release lever. You're going to have to push the clutch release lever towards the front of the bike as hard as you can; at the same time, you will also have to push the cable away from you and out of the mounting bracket. It took me quite awhile to get it done, but it is do-able this way.
[If anyone knows of a better way to get the cable off of the clutch release lever, please feel free to post it here or PM me, and I'll add it]

fig.2


fig.3




Refer to fig.4-5
Using your 8mm socket, remove the 12 bolts from around the clutch cover. One of the bolts is slightly behind the upper fairing, but it can still be easily removed using a ratchet without an extension. Rotate the clutch release lever counter-clockwise as far as it will go. Using your flat head screwdriver, gently pry on the flat edges pointed out in fig.5. DO NOT shove anything between the cover and the transmission as this will most likely damage the surfaces and cause an oil leak. It should not take much force to pry the cover off. Once removed, set the cover to the side.

fig.4


fig.5




Refer to fig.6-7
Take your 10mm socket and remove the five bolts holding the springs in place. Although I don't know if it's entirely necessary, I recommend removing the bolts in a star pattern - same as you would remove the lugs on a wheel. Pull the old springs out, put the new springs in their place, then torque the retaining bolts back to 7.25 ft/lbs. Using your gasket scraper or razer blade, gently scrape away any excess gasket remaining on both the cover and the transmission. Be very carefull not to dig into the sealing surfaces, as this could easily create an oil leak.

fig.6


fig.7




Once both the clutch cover and transmission have been thoroughly cleaned of any foreign particles (particularly any pieces of gasket that may have fallen into the cover or transmission during scraping), put the new gasket on the cover and place the cover back on the transmission. Make sure everything is lined up properly and that the alignment pins on the cover are in the proper place. Rotate the clutch release lever clockwise as far as it will go. This should pull the clutch cover up to the transmission. Re-install the 12 bolts, and torque them down to 7.25 ft/lbs. Clean the bottom of the clutch cover and transmission as best you can, so that any possible oil leaks will be easy to spot.

Replace the throttle adjustment cable into it's holder. Using your pliers, slip the clutch cable back into it's mounting bracket. Insert the opposite end of the clutch cable into the bottom of the clutch lever, and re-install the lever assembly on the handlebars. Re-adjust the clutch cable tensioner at the end of the lever assembly. You will probably have to ride the bike to adjust it to your proper "feel".

Refill the engine with oil (being carefull not to over-fill, as the oil filter was never removed). Check for any obvious oil leakage. Start the bike, and let it run for about 5-10 minutes, or ride it until it reaches normal operating temperature. The oil should now be thinned out to it's normal operating consistency, so if it were going to leak out, this would be it's most oportune time. If there is any slow oil seepage, try tightening the lower clutch cover bolts just a little. Be very carefull not to strip or snap any of the bolts! If this does not help, or the leak is a considerable one, you will have to drain the oil again, and check to make sure that you cleaned all of the gasket off of both surfaces.


And that's it. Enjoy your new-and-improved clutch grab!



***Disclaimer***
I am NOT a professional mechanic, and I do NOT guarantee that my tutorial is 100% sound advice. I am merely conveying, to anyone who wants to read it, what I did to my bike. Use this tutorial at your OWN RISK.

With that out of the way, if there is anything you see that could be made better, or anything that needs to be corrected, just tell me, and I'll try to fix/add it. Thank you.


**07Dec2006 EDIT**
Added torque specs for required components.


**ADDENDUM**
For those wanting to see the difference between the stock springs and the Barnett springs: (The Barnett springs are the shiny ones)


 

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nice....now to be honest....I am too lazy to have read it all, but rather just looked at the pictures! What is the improvement of new springs? I realize this is a bit of a silly question, but like I said, laziness is paramount right now. And by the way, that tutorial was not good at all, it was flipping amazing! Could you re-do some Army manuals for the Army please?????

:notworthy
 

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The stock springs are a little weak, probably so beginners have an easier time with clutch pull. If you ride it hard, it might allow some clutch slip. Also some preliminary investigation by BRP idicates that some batches of the stock clutch springs may be too short.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
jsmith6 said:
nice....now to be honest....I am too lazy to have read it all, but rather just looked at the pictures! What is the improvement of new springs? I realize this is a bit of a silly question, but like I said, laziness is paramount right now. And by the way, that tutorial was not good at all, it was flipping amazing! Could you re-do some Army manuals for the Army please?????

:notworthy
ThagAnderson81 said:
First, the new springs (made by Barnett) looked to be wound much tighter than the OEM springs, which is why I chose them. I immediately noticed the difference when riding. I had to change the way I let out the clutch during normal riding just to keep the bike from jerking too much. The feel at the clutch lever is also much improved; there is more "feeling" in the pull of the lever, whereas before, it felt very soft to me.
Hah, if the Army's manuals are anything like the Air Force's maintenance instruction manuals I used to have to deal with, then I feel your pain! I hated those things so flippin' bad. It sounds like a boring tedious job, but maybe I could make some good money doing it. Hmmm :thinkerg:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Check out my new post here for my thoughts on the mods after ~500 miles.
 

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CrimsonCloak said:
The stock springs are a little weak, probably so beginners have an easier time with clutch pull. If you ride it hard, it might allow some clutch slip. Also some preliminary investigation by BRP idicates that some batches of the stock clutch springs may be too short.
So Cloak, if I were to move up to a ZX6R or ZX10R, would the clutch feel drastically different? A lot more stiff or more resistance? Is this the same thing as in cars, where my Cobra has a heavy duty King Cobra clutch that is a racing clutch. It is much stiffer and has a higher release point as opposed to a Mustang GT. Same thing? Would this be a good idea to install if I am just using the bike to ride to and from work mainly? Thanks for all the answers to my many questions!
 

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On the 650, it's a good idea to change the springs. I have been told by a few owners, that thier clutch is slipping, when coming off corners hard.As Cloak said, I've checked a few clutches, and found different lenght spings, in different engines.
 

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cost of springs and how long did it take you to do this? lastly and most importantly to me, how much bike wrench turning time did you have before you did this?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
jsmith6 said:
cost of springs and how long did it take you to do this? lastly and most importantly to me, how much bike wrench turning time did you have before you did this?
Well, I took apart and cleaned the engine on my first bike, a Honda CB650c (year escapes me). Never did anything to my R6 except change the oil, but I've rebuilt the engine in my first truck, as well as fix many different problems with many of the vehicles I have owned. It took me about 1 1/2 - 2 hours from start to finish, including taking the pictures. It's really quite simple, just make sure you have everything you will need for the project beforehand. On a scale from 1 - 10, with 1 being tightening the chain, and 10 being removing the engine from the chassis to tear-down and rebuild; I would say this project was a 3 or 4.
 

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very tempting....

Thag, I would like to know about microwaving cats please, primarily for profit, fun is just an added bonus.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
jsmith6 said:
very tempting....

Thag, I would like to know about microwaving cats please, primarily for profit, fun is just an added bonus.
Ok. First you're gonna need to find a bunch of free cats. Paying for the cats is counter-intuitive, and should never be considered as an option, as there are plenty of free ones. Once you have all your cats, just start throwing those suckers into the microwave for about 10 minutes a piece, and sit back, relax, and wait for the money to start rolling in! The only limiting factor to how much money you make is YOU! There is nothing to buy up front, no fees to pay, and best of all, this is not one of those silly pyramid schemes with other people making WAY more money than you do while doing the same thing.


Actual testimony from Becky Bumsworth in Winchstertonfieldville, Ohiho:
"It's so easy to do! You just pop the cat in the microwave, login to you bank account, and watch your money grow! I made over a million dollars in my first year!*"




*These results are not typical. Your actual results may vary. Alot.
 

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I, uh, need to change my underwear.

:hah:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
jsmith6 said:
Is this the same thing as in cars, where my Cobra has a heavy duty King Cobra clutch that is a racing clutch. It is much stiffer and has a higher release point as opposed to a Mustang GT. Same thing? Would this be a good idea to install if I am just using the bike to ride to and from work mainly?
As far as your first question: the principles behind why the clutch in your Cobra feels different than a normal Mustang are different than on our bikes, but the end result is similar. The new springs cause the clutch to react in the same way as your Cobra. The clutch lever feels stiffer, just as your car does, and the clutch disengages more suddenly than stock, similar to the higher release point of your Cobra. Disengagement is more "sudden" and "stiff" than with the stock springs, which takes a little while to get used to. However, after driving your Cobra for awhile, I'm sure you were able to shift without jerking the car back and forth as you inevitably did while getting used to the different feeling of the clutch. Same thing with the bike.

If you mainly ride to and from work, I wouldn't recommend changing the springs unless you can feel the clutch slipping now. There would really be no point.
 

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ThagAnderson81 said:
As far as your first question: the principles behind why the clutch in your Cobra feels different than a normal Mustang are different than on our bikes, but the end result is similar. The new springs cause the clutch to react in the same way as your Cobra. The clutch lever feels stiffer, just as your car does, and the clutch disengages more suddenly than stock, similar to the higher release point of your Cobra. Disengagement is more "sudden" and "stiff" than with the stock springs, which takes a little while to get used to. However, after driving your Cobra for awhile, I'm sure you were able to shift without jerking the car back and forth as you inevitably did while getting used to the different feeling of the clutch. Same thing with the bike.

If you mainly ride to and from work, I wouldn't recommend changing the springs unless you can feel the clutch slipping now. There would really be no point.

thanks! that comparison works for me!
 

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thag were did you get that torque "7.25 ft/lbs" for the the clutch spring retianing bolts. the only specs I can get for them are 78 in / lbs

is it differn't for these new springs?
 

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two differnt dealers told me that it was 78 so most likely they just didn't care. and told me 78 instead of 87 thanks for the info I just wanted to be sure
 
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