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Hey guys, ive been lookin at getting an SV650S. I cant really afford an 03 and up bike which has fuel injection...so do u guys think that the Non-fuel injected ones are worse off? I dont want to buy a non-fuel injected bike if it means there are gonna be more problems in the future. what can i expect difference wise in performance and reliablity?
 

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Fuel injection (aka FI) has pros and cons, IMO.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with carbs. Many riders (especially, uh, "experienced" ones) prefer well dialed-in carbureted bikes to newer fuel injected machines. Carbs and their mixes can be changed and/or adjusted, whereas with fuel injection you have to buy something like a Power Commander or get custom "maps" to change the fuel delivery rate. Both forms of fuel delivery can perform equally well - or equally bad. It just depends on how they're set up.

Carb'd bikes can have very smooth off-throttle response, whereas some FI'd bikes are a little (or a lot) "jumpy". The fuel delivery and power can be very sudden and even a little scary. Ask anyone who owns a stock '06 Yamaha FZ1, a bike notorious for a snappy throttle due to a nasty FI issue.

Warm-up on a carb'd bike usually means adjusting the choke lever as the bike warms up after you start it the first time that day, and after it's been sitting awhile while you're at work, etc. Not a pain, but a minor annoyance if you're in a hurry. FI bikes, on the other hand, you can start up and ride away on the spot, though even FI bikes should be warmed up a bit before you ride off. A well tuned carb'd bike should start easily, as should any FI bike.

Maintenance: Carbs are supposed to be drained (Is that the right term?) during winterization of a bike. They have to be cleaned from time to time, but from what I know it's not rocket science.

By comparison, FI bikes don't need as much TLC, nor do fuel injectors need special treatment during winterization.

As for reliability, carbs have been used for a long, long time and are still being used in many bikes, even brand new ones on the showroom floor. FI is also very reliable and its use is increasing in new models every year.

FI is here to stay. Even many cruisers (including Harleys) now feature FI. Manufacturers are getting better at simulating the smoothness of carb'd bikes using modern FI, but some people still prefer the carbs.

All that being said, I really wanted fuel injection on my current bike. I'm not the most mechanically inclined person, so the lower maintenance aspect of FI appealed to me, plus I like modern/techno wizardry stuff.

(My apologies if I've erred on any facts in this post. Feel free to correct me if necessary.)
 

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I prefer EFI for these reasons:

-the components of a EFI system are compartmentalized, so it's easier to diagnose problems and fix.

-the fuel is delivered at a higher pressure and closer to the combustion chamber, which results in finer atomization, more power, better fuel efficiency/emissions, and easier starting.

-the fuel injectors are electronically triggered to open precisely when the intake valve is ready, which reduces re-atomization and pooling of the fuel in the intake manifold. (Well, this isn't always true. Sequential multiport FI is the best because each cylinders' injector sprays independently at just the right moment. Non-sequential multiport FI injectors spray all at the same time every other cycle, so the fuel has to wait for a split second before entering the combustion chamber. Throttle body injection is the most rudimentary, having only one injector(instead of one for each cylinder)located further up in the manifold, basically like a high pressure computerized carburetor. But unlike cars, bikes usually have have an independent throttle body for each cylinder, and their intake manifolds are so small that throttle body FI on a bike is practically the same as multi-port FI on a car.)

-no choke to dial in or cold start hiccups

-dual carbs need to be synchronized and can be tempermental

-cold starting is easier

-the ECU will often even tell you what's wrong!

-air, altitute, and temp sensors work with the EFI system to maximize efficiency and performance.
 

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Carbs and their mixes can be changed and/or adjusted, whereas with fuel injection you have to buy something like a Power Commander or get custom "maps" to change the fuel delivery rate.
yes but the power commander is much easier to use than rejetting a carburetor IMO.
 

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is it true that ethanol additives in gasoline do not behave as well in carb'd bikes compared to fuel injected bikes?
 

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Tell you one thing I loved the injection on my Z.Had the Powercommander when I bought it.The F I was very smooth.I was hesitant trading my Z for a ZRX only cause it had carbs.But It has the Ivan Jet kit with modified air box dialed in.It has torque from 3000 to whenever.But as long as you like use fuel stabilizer in the winter I never had trouble with carbs.
Craig
 

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TimC said:
Carbs are supposed to be drained (Is that the right term?) during winterization of a bike.
Winterization... winter... what's that? I never have problem with carbs cuz I ride all year now... no more storage problem and draining and battery tender... just ride it :~


But I'd have to vote for fuel injection...

- I'm pretty mechanically inclined... change my oil, do my mods... but I still dont want to clean my carbs and jet it and all that... it just sound like rocket science and should be left to the Pros... (though nowaday I dont really trust the people at the bike shop much anymore after the good oil spill mishap...)

- Choking the bike sucks... Sometime it's cold outside and I have to crank the baby and let her sit there for a couple minute to warm up before I can hop on and ride... that's no fun... kills the mood.... I want her to always be ready for me to press the turn on button and go! :woot:

- "supposedly" more fuel efficient... that is... supposedly...

-It's the future baby.... Common!


Those would be my reasons...
 

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Vinhtvu2 said:
Choking the bike sucks... Sometime it's cold outside and I have to crank the baby and let her sit there for a couple minute to warm up before I can hop on and ride... that's no fun... kills the mood.... I want her to always be ready for me to press the turn on button and go!
I agree!! I love my ZR, BUT... it would be so great not to have to use the choke and give her a little gas as I hit the starter - then wait longer than any of my FI buddies for her to warm up. I'm looking forward to having FI someday!
 

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Cleaning carbs out on bikes takes 20 mins and is simple. Couple screws and a short piece of wire is about all it takes.

Anyways, In cars I go for carbs because I'm comfortable with them and can tune them myself and such. A carb kept in tune will get just as good a mileage and what not as fuel injection. In theory is the the only place it works opposite. The thing is, you have to keep an eye on carbs, they can fall out of tune much much easier then fuel injection. Thats their main strength.

Fuel injection has its good points, and most have been covered. But either way you'll be happy, as neither causes a big problem with driving them.
 

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If you want to drain the carb(s) it's a whole lot easier to stop the flow of gas to the carb(s) and just let the bike idle until the carb(s) run out of gas. Either that or, after stopping the flow of gas, open the drain plug(s) and drain 'em. For bikes with vaccuum petcocks, just disconnect the fuel line from the tank and plug off the line to keep little insects/dust/dirt from getting into the hose.
 

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I started out on a carbed bike, and it really wasn't that bad. It ran pretty well most of the time, but the poor 500 did not like to run below about 34 degrees nor did it adjust well to radical altitude changes. The big advantage I see for fuel injection is a slight increase in fuel economy in most cases, and it definitely adjusts better to changing conditions and altitude. But my daily driver cage is carbed, and it works just fine for me. Carbs work just fine, I just personally consider FI a nice little upgrade.
 

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I'd buy a new carb'ed bike, but not a used one. Since with bikes you are usually dealing with two or four carbs, one for each cylinder, they have to be perfectly synchronized for the bike to run smoothly. When carbs get old the bearings for the throttle butterfly start to leak air, which is a bad thing because they rely on engine vacuum to meter fuel delivery. Too many other mechanical parts too worry about wearing out as well.
I don't know, maybe if it was such a good deal that replacing the carbs would make it worthwhile, or it had less that 20,000 miles I'd consider it. The beauty of fuel injection is the parts usually either work or they fail, no guessing about what could be on it's way out. Bikes get pretty abused if you think about it, so I bought new.
Bikes are all about that kick in the pants thrill ride...Think about it, what's going to give you better performance, relying on the engines' vacuum to suck the fuel through an orifice, or "jet" :rolleyes: like a gerbil trying to drink some water, or a 40psi precision spray nozzle soleniod triggered to fire ultra atomized highly combustible fuel at the precise moment of opimum performance? I just can't wait 'til direct injection becomes the standard.
 

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i used to own a SV650S K2 which is carbed. I now have a Z750 which is injected. IMO there is not a huge difference between the fueling methods.
Just get the bike you want.
 

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Carbs and EFI both have their own little quirks, but carb bikes are cheaper (most of the time) and just require a little more attention. EFI bike are easier to mod. Really it just comes down to what your personal preference is, and you should ride both before you buy if possible. Make sure you do your research on the type of bike as well. :2cents:
 

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Fuel injection (aka FI) has pros and cons, IMO.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with carbs. Many riders (especially, uh, "experienced" ones) prefer well dialed-in carbureted bikes to newer fuel injected machines. Carbs and their mixes can be changed and/or adjusted, whereas with fuel injection you have to buy something like a Power Commander or get custom "maps" to change the fuel delivery rate. Both forms of fuel delivery can perform equally well - or equally bad. It just depends on how they're set up.

Carb'd bikes can have very smooth off-throttle response, whereas some FI'd bikes are a little (or a lot) "jumpy". The fuel delivery and power can be very sudden and even a little scary. Ask anyone who owns a stock '06 Yamaha FZ1, a bike notorious for a snappy throttle due to a nasty FI issue.

Warm-up on a carb'd bike usually means adjusting the choke lever as the bike warms up after you start it the first time that day, and after it's been sitting awhile while you're at work, etc. Not a pain, but a minor annoyance if you're in a hurry. FI bikes, on the other hand, you can start up and ride away on the spot, though even FI bikes should be warmed up a bit before you ride off. A well tuned carb'd bike should start easily, as should any FI bike.

Maintenance: Carbs are supposed to be drained (Is that the right term?) during winterization of a bike. They have to be cleaned from time to time, but from what I know it's not rocket science.

By comparison, FI bikes don't need as much TLC, nor do fuel injectors need special treatment during winterization.

As for reliability, carbs have been used for a long, long time and are still being used in many bikes, even brand new ones on the showroom floor. FI is also very reliable and its use is increasing in new models every year.

FI is here to stay. Even many cruisers (including Harleys) now feature FI. Manufacturers are getting better at simulating the smoothness of carb'd bikes using modern FI, but some people still prefer the carbs.

All that being said, I really wanted fuel injection on my current bike. I'm not the most mechanically inclined person, so the lower maintenance aspect of FI appealed to me, plus I like modern/techno wizardry stuff.

(My apologies if I've erred on any facts in this post. Feel free to correct me if necessary.)
Fuel injection (aka FI) has pros and cons, IMO.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with carbs. Many riders (especially, uh, "experienced" ones) prefer well dialed-in carbureted bikes to newer fuel injected machines. Carbs and their mixes can be changed and/or adjusted, whereas with fuel injection you have to buy something like a Power Commander or get custom "maps" to change the fuel delivery rate. Both forms of fuel delivery can perform equally well - or equally bad. It just depends on how they're set up.

Carb'd bikes can have very smooth off-throttle response, whereas some FI'd bikes are a little (or a lot) "jumpy". The fuel delivery and power can be very sudden and even a little scary. Ask anyone who owns a stock '06 Yamaha FZ1, a bike notorious for a snappy throttle due to a nasty FI issue.

Warm-up on a carb'd bike usually means adjusting the choke lever as the bike warms up after you start it the first time that day, and after it's been sitting awhile while you're at work, etc. Not a pain, but a minor annoyance if you're in a hurry. FI bikes, on the other hand, you can start up and ride away on the spot, though even FI bikes should be warmed up a bit before you ride off. A well tuned carb'd bike should start easily, as should any FI bike.

Maintenance: Carbs are supposed to be drained (Is that the right term?) during winterization of a bike. They have to be cleaned from time to time, but from what I know it's not rocket science.

By comparison, FI bikes don't need as much TLC, nor do fuel injectors need special treatment during winterization.

As for reliability, carbs have been used for a long, long time and are still being used in many bikes, even brand new ones on the showroom floor. FI is also very reliable and its use is increasing in new models every year.

FI is here to stay. Even many cruisers (including Harleys) now feature FI. Manufacturers are getting better at simulating the smoothness of carb'd bikes using modern FI, but some people still prefer the carbs.

All that being said, I really wanted fuel injection on my current bike. I'm not the most mechanically inclined person, so the lower maintenance aspect of FI appealed to me, plus I like modern/techno wizardry stuff.

(My apologies if I've erred on any facts in this post. Feel free to correct me if necessary.)
sorry i just want to know wich has horsepower FI or carby for a kawasaki ex250 engine
 

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sorry i just want to know wich has horsepower FI or carby for a kawasaki ex250 engine
A fuel injected engine will usually give you the optimum horsepower when you are comparing unmodified systems on the same bike.
 

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I would be careful of bikes that first came out with fuel injection when it all started. I remember reading reviews where they said the throttle response was rough. I think the early feel injector nozzles didn’t have as many holes in them compared to the new ones which do a better job of atomizing the fuel. Yeah I feel injection is nice but it’s not a dealbreaker for me when coming to buy a bike. I would rather get a motorcycle that’s been well cared for and it has good service receipt records rather than just picking one that’s carbureted over fuel injected. synchronizing the carbs is not a big deal you just need the right tool to do it. once carburetors are cleaned and synced they usually stay that way for a while and run good.
 
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