RiderForums.com - Kawasaki Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Silver Member
Joined
·
881 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was checking out Purdues awesome Cobra Replica.

Got me thinking I have often noticed you guys have a lot of concrete roads, often with bitumen over the expansion joints.
Isn't that kinda slippery when it rains ?


:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
990 Posts
Couldn't be any worse than tramlines ...

:)
 

·
MotoMacGyver
Joined
·
2,545 Posts
Ok, I read this in the Brit bike magazines. What the heck is "bitumen"?

Emrah
 

·
West Coast Moderator
Joined
·
13,030 Posts
We have alot of concrete freeways here around San Diego. Actually they are all slick when it rains because of the road grime build-up. We don't get much rain, so when it does it's just one huge "Slip-n-Slide". Plus there are also the uneven rain grooves. Even when it's dry the bike can get a little squirrelly sometimes. The joints are just another nuisance to deal with.
 

·
Dirty Harry.... Moderator
Joined
·
9,811 Posts
Concrete freeways basically stink for MC riding, but here in the southern US it's only in parts of the interstate system. Lower maintenance is the reason, I think. Tom
 

·
Silver Member
Joined
·
881 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
What the heck is "bitumen"?



" A semi solid mixture of complex hydrocarbons derived from coal or petroleum. Used as a waterproof binder or protective coating."

It's just something we learn as kids. Race car commentators always talk about ".. keeping it on the bitumen. "

I think it comes from bituminous black ( coal ) which is the tar found in tarmacadam ( or tarmac ), which is :

" Road or paving material combining crushed stone, rolled and mixed with bitumen type mixer. "

I think for us bitumen and asphalt is the same stuff.

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
499 Posts
road surface

To answer your question; Yes, it is slippery stuff, especially when wet. Riding on concrete and having these little bits of heaven roll under your tires can lead to some very interesting moments. It can get real exciting when leaned over.

The tar like product that has rock chips rolled into it and is then rolled down is called "chip seal" in the Phoenix area. Probably has a bunch of names depending on where you're from.

The tar strips you see on the roads and highways in the USA are often called "road snakes". Again, depends on where you're from.

IMHO, tram lines, railroad tracks to us Yanks, are the most common road hazards I can think of. Even worse when the approach is a steel plate!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
660 Posts
jajamase,

Are you in the Phoenix area as well?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
499 Posts
JET

Not now. We, my wife and I, were there for about 10 years, 9 years ago.

We woke up with an attack of poor taste one AM and moved here to the Midwest.

Anyway, there are plenty of road snakes and POTHOLES here too!

When we were there, we lived on Monte Rosa and 38th St. We were married at 40th North Apts. in the party room, but that's another tale.

Later...............
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,274 Posts
my mom works for an asphalt company so i know a bit about this stuff.

the "road snakes" are usually something called "asphalt cement", at least that's what it's called on the east coast. it is petroleum product that is applied hot and then hardens as it cools but is designed to stay a little soft so it can flex and seal joints in asphalt like cracks or the edge of a repaired spot.

here's how they fix cracks in asphalt. a good job entails cutting the crack open to a uniform width, clearing it of debris and then laying in the hot asphalt cement (hot AC) to a level just over the road surface. it bonds to the sides of the newly cut channel and the top road surface. it seals the road surface together keeping water from getting under the asphalt and ruining the road. often, there is no cutting of the asphalt and the hot AC is just laid on top of the crack. this does not adhere as well but is a faster and less expensive procedure. both procedures are much less expensive than a full repaving.

when cool it is pliable, you could dig a screwdriver into it without much trouble. when hot, like under hot summer sun, it is almost liquid again. it can get stuck to your shoes and tires and may pull away like chewing gum.

no matter what temperature this stuff is much slicker and softer than regular asphalt. i once saw a guy lose his front wheel on a full dress harley and wash out on a hot summer day. it was at a traffic light. he was only going about 20 mph and in a very slight curve. scared the hell out of me to watch him go down that easily. he limped away, stiff but not too hurt.

scott :)
 

·
MotoMacGyver
Joined
·
2,545 Posts
Titomike,

Ah yes, "tarmac". Why didn't you say so? :)

I'm wondering if Metzeler named one of their touring tires "Macadam" from tarmacadam you mentioned.

Anyway, as far as road hazards go, I'm surprised some of the other Californians haven't mentioned the Botts Dots - or as I like to call them, Satan's Death Bumps.

I've bitched to no end on previous threads on these ridiculous contraptions. They are essentially "rumblestrips" for lanes. And as far as I can tell, only the backasswards state has them.

They are 1.5" to 2" high reflective plastic "bumps" spaced a foot or so apart all the way down the lane on the paint stripes. I suppose Cali government doesn't think simple lanes stripes are enough - like everywhere else in the Free World. No, we have to deal with these Godforsaken things on ALL roadways. I'm sure they've killed more than a few motorcyclists. They kick and shimmy your front wheel when changing lanes (unless you can cut real sharply from one lane to another and try to split between them). In the dry, they're highly annoying and if you're leaned over (like making a left turn onto another street), I've had my front wheel skid out, then grab and jerk the bars violently more than a few times. In the wet, Faaaaahgettaboutit! Pucker up your rear and pray.

The designer of them (perhaps someone named "Botts"???), the flathead screwdriver, and Allen head bolts should be strung up and made to die a slow and torturous death (ever see the "vice" scene in the movie "Casino"?, that would be good).

I'm going to miss fantastic mountain roads here, but at least in less than 2 weeks, I'll hopefully never have to deal with these damned things again! :yell: :yell:

Phew, I'm done now.

Emrah
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
660 Posts
emrah,

When I lived in Texas we called them City Tiddies. We've got them here in Arizona but not so big. I guess you could call them idy bitty city tiddies :)

jajamase,

My wife and I lived in 40th North when we first got married.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
990 Posts
Small correction (meant in the nicest possible way) jajamase ...

Tramlines are tramlines, railroad tracks are railroad tracks.

I was staggered to hear recently that my fair city (Melbourne, Australia) is one of only five in the world to have a tramway (ie. streetcar) system.

I think this may be playing with words (ie. I don't believe it), since surely lots of cities (eg. in Europe) have so-called 'light rail' systems, which are not too different (albeit perhaps they travel a little faster).

Anyway, tramlines run along the road, meaning that for miles and miles you have two potentially very very slippery strips going in the same direction as you. Particularly nasty when it's wet.

We learn to avoid them (or cross them at a distinct angle) very early in our riding careers.

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
499 Posts
tramlines

Scottmac 99,

You're right!! I forgot all about those nasty things!

We don't have those here in Pork Corners but I have seen them in other places.

They get my vote for #1 ugly stuff in the road, with road snakes a close 2nd.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top