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Discussion Starter #1
If you haven't syncronized the carbs on your bike yet, it's well worth the time. If anyone in the area (or out of the area for that matter, but ya gotta come to my house) doesn't want to pay shop rates to have it done, gimme an e-mail and we'll set up a time to do it. It's easy and doesn't take very long. I won't charge ya a dime. You're bike will thank you and you'll probably kick yourself for not doing it sooner.
 

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I heard the Morgan Carbtune carb syncing gauge is a good one (the one with the stainless steel rods in a plastic case) and was going to order one. Just wondering if anyone has one and are they good.
Along the same lines just how much airflow do you need on the motor when you are doing the carb sync. Are a couple of ordinary household fans enough?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I remember seeing winter.........somewhere else!!:laugh: :laugh:
 

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winter??? you mean that time of year i'd see back in new york when i'd surf in february with 20 degree air and 30 degree water??? no thanks!! out her i don't even need wet suit booties :)

scott
 

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Morgan Carbtune

Got my Carbtune today and I'm looking forward to trying it out. Just wondering about the brass connector fittings that come with it - do we need them to connect the gauge up to our bike?
I imagine that we just pull of the hoses/plugs ond connect the Carbtune gauges straight on.
 

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i lsot the instrutions for the carbtune so i just sorta made my own instructions up as i went. i did recall that we should put the clear restrictors in the hose, so i cut the piece in the box into 4 peices and spliced one piece into each hose. it seemed to work fine.

i never used the brass fittings. those might be a BMW thing? who knows...
 

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Thanks Falcon
I still haven't synched the carbs but I read the instructions right through and you don't need them on a ZR-7 because there are already little vacuum ports on each carb.
Apparently you screw them in if you have a bike that doesn't already have the vacuum hose ports.
You did the right thing with the clear tube, one in each tube to restrict the pulsing of the gauge.
 

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Well, I had my first service on the bike yesturday...They have listed oil filter $7.74 4 cycle engin oil 4 quarts $12.12 and First service .8 hrs $48.00 supplies $3.00 for a grand total of 70.86 before tax and 72.23 with sales tax. It took them about an hour to do what they were doing and I didn't feel nosey enough to try to look over their shoulder in the service area. It said in the comments that they changed oil and filter, adjusted and lubed chain, adjusted clutch play, checked fluid levels, and checked air pressure in tires. What do you bet they didn't do anything that you guys are mentioning here such as retorquing head studs, exhaust nuts, and syncing the carbs. They already said they don't do valve adjustments at the first service and agree with what some of you guys were saying that these bikes don't really need it. They say go every like 6000-15000 miles for valve adjustments. I know I didn't really do my job about asking exactly what they were planning to do or making sure they did the jobs required, so what would you guys do if you were in my position? The only thing I don't like is that they list 'First Service @ $48.00' but don't list anything like the carb sync which is supposed to be done at that point. What do you think? Thanks in advance. -Jamie
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If you go by their edited version, consider yourself "GOUGED" if the go by the book's 500 mile first service, consider yourself "GOUGED DEEP".

Unfortunately, you have to be really specific with the service managers or you're going to get what they have on a list. And to go with that, if they don't have a "Menu" for you to read with the prices on it, you'll probably end up paying hourly shop rate for your requests.

If you're mechanically inclined, do yourself a favor and buy the shop manual. The services aren't hard to do. About the only things you will need other than a stock tool kit is a torque wrench and a set of carb sync's. But you can farm those back to the shop as specific tasks to be performed if you want and they probably have a set price for those. :cool:
 

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Well, I am more than mechanically inclined I'd say having rebuilt a 1962 MGA Mk II Coupe and mantaining some 20 year old Italian iron... My dad wanted to 'maintain a relationship' with the dealer though. Personally I don't think dealers should do anything but sell me the bike... The only reason I didn't object to taking it in is for the record keeping. How can I as an owner document services where if 10 years down the road a buyer will believe that I did indeed service the bike at X date and X milage?

I am familiar with syncing carbs, but does anyone have a picture of the sync tool needed for the carbs on this bike? I have an old British UniSync that I guess would work just as well as anything, but I'm not familiar with the looks of the throat of the carbs.

And finally is there a place online I can buy the shop manual or the needed carb syncronizer? Other than that I've got just about anytool anyone could ever need... ;) Thanks. -Jamie
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
As long as you keep a good stack of receipts for items like filters and gaskets and if you bought any shims and other parts and a journal for the dates and mileages, that should pretty much do it. Just as long as the person thumbing through the journal doesn't smear fresh ink when it's dated a year and a half ago and the oil in the sight window isn't a tar-like-substance.

If you click over to the home page and go into "maintenance", I'm sure there's stuff on carb sync in there. As far as syncronizers, there's a few out on the market. The one I have uses mercury and there's some newer types that don't. Just as long as you can hook up to 4 carbs at the same time. It's pretty much personal preference as to the make.

You can go to www.buykawasaki.com and order a manual or you should be able to get one through the parts guy at the dealer.

Also in the maint. section of the home page I sent in some alternate filter #'s and makes because I got tired of paying $7 and $8 for a filter. There's all kinds of good info in there that should pretty much cover most of the bike that's been contributed by alot of folks here on the site. If there's something pressing that you need out of the manual, e-mail me direct and I'll send you the page(s) that cover it. :cool:

BTW, mine is made by "Motion Pro".
 

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500 mile service

Jaime,

Do a valve adjustment ASAP. My dealership said to wait until 3,000 miles...and I did. One of my exhaust valves had zero gap and two or three other needed attention. I would have never made it to 5,000~6,000 miles. Some engines need it, others don't. Mine did and I was lucky to catch it when I did.

Kawasaki would have declined to cover the engine damage. It's up to you...

Philip
 

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I'm planning on a 500 mile valve adjustment, whether it is truely needed or not. If you have a tight valve, you run the risk of potentially burning the valve and valve seat. This especially holds true for exhaust valves. Philip brings up an excellant point, regarding the voidance of warrentee if that service is not performed. Ninety percent of all maintenance req's can be done by competant owners who are mechanically inclined. The other 10% require that we shell out some cash....oh well.

Since they are shim type valves, I'll foot the bill an let the service dept. go through the pain of yanking the cams and adjusting; they do that stuff in heir sleep. If they were screw-type, I'd be all to happy to do it myself (one of the few plusses for the Badit-600) on my original checklist. Nice thing about shim-types is that they have much longer intervals between adjustments than screw-types do.

Maybe you can have them synch the carbs at the same time they adjust the valves, if you're so inclined...two specialty services in one visit.
 
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