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What can I do to increase the effectiveness of the front brakes. Not that I want to do stoppies but it would be nice to know I could if needed be. The front suspension on the zr7s isn't to bad but the brakes leave something to be desired.:D
 

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Well, one way to get a little better braking power is to replace your stock pads with higher quality pads. I haven't done this yet, but I have read that it works. You could also steel braid your brake lines. If you have a lot of extra cash you could always try new discs, like Galfers. I have ridden a VFR with Galfers after riding one with stock brakes, and they are a little stronger, though they make more noise. Hope this information helps somewhat.
 

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Fit the Hyperpro front end if you haven't done so already.

Without it the forks bottom before the brakes run out of grab.

:)
 

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Try stainless steel brake lines, your eyes will pop out during the first hard stop!:eek:

The brings up the next fix after the stainless steel lines. The forks will bottom almost instantly with the stock springs. Try the PVC or new spring fix and set the preload to 3/4"~1".

Their is nothing wrong with the brake pads, it's the rest of the system.

Philip
 

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hey phil, do you have the steel braided lines? i'm considering getting them since i want to get 1" bar risers and i'll need a new front brake line anyway.

scott :)
 

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I installed the Progressive fork springs, increased the fork oil wt to 15wt, and add braided streel brake lines in front. Combined all of this changes seem to make a big difference stopping. I think the biggest change is that the forks no longer dive deep when applying the brakes. No dive equals more braking power and better control. The steel lines seem to give the brakes a more solid feel and the increased fork oil weight helped dampen the rebound.

In summary, all of the changes totally transform the bikes handling and braking.
 

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I will second what Chuck said.
I have Hyperpro fork kit with 15W oil, stainles hoses AND Carbonne Lorraine HH sintered pads (they do make a difference).
The result is much more stopping power plus it's usable and progressive.

I also use these pads to the rear and they are much better than stock. Later I installed stainless hose to the rear as well, but I'm not sure I'll keep it. It's a bit too much and sometimes I end up slowing down a lot. I like to use the rear to trim off some speed in the twisties, maybe I'll get used to it, otherwise I might go back to the rubber hose for the rear brake.
Aris
 

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thanks chuck :) thanks aris :)

does either of you guys have the holeshot steel braided lines? do you think there would be enough room to raise the bars 1" with them installed or should i get longer ones just to be safe?

aris, do you think the pads give you a more progressive feel on the rear brake? i ask because i've locked the rear brake on my last few emergency stops. the problem probably has more to do with my panic braking technique than the pads but new pads might not hurt.

scott :)
 

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Scott A

Scott,

My story has a different out look than most on brake pads and such.

I've got stainless steel front brake lines (Goodrich) installed. I did the line change (custom made) when I changed to a taller (Brand: Factory, ATV, Al., Blue) handle bar. The OEM rubber lines didn't have much room to play around with. The OEM rubber lines will allow you to pull the brake back to the handle bar. Once the stainless steel lines are install and bled with fresh fluid. Brake travel will be less than half of that distance.

None of my local Kawasaki dealers had rear ZR-7 brakes in stock. So I wound up going with some EBC pads ($29.99) for the rear. I've tried EBC and a few more "after market" brands in the past. Most of them have a shorter life span than the OEM units. My Gold Wing sounded like a coasting saw blades with EBC on the front and rear! My Honda CB650SC had less braking power with some dual-compound jobs from way back.

Brake pads, brake line and fluid are cheap in the long run. I would guess that almost any new brake product will perform better than a worn out old part...;)

Later,

Philip
 

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Scott,
I looked at the steel brake lines on my bike and there does not appear to be enough slack in the cables to allow a 1" rise. I would not take a chance that these cables will work. You will need longer cables.

FYI - I ordered my cables from Holeshot.
 

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thanks for the input guys :) i talked to dale at holeshot and he said he could make me up a brake line with 1" extra line for $12 more than the standard line. that's pretty steep so i may see about just getting the common line replaced locall... for now ;)

phil, i keep forgetting that it's you with the blue atv bars :) did you get your lines made at a local shop or did you order them from a specilaty shop? anyone else have experience with getting brake lines made up?

thanks again,

scott :)
 
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