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The winter has finally set in with a vengeance here and after the holidays this year I'm going to sink a few $$$ into the '14 Ninja 1k. I just had the 50k mile service done. All the valves near the middle of spec., new chain/sprockets, plugs, etc. Their recommendations were: Tires, steering head bearings, rear brake shoes, front rotors. Steering head bearings and rear brake shoe recommendations were valid, the rest not. The mechanic wrote on the ticket the PR5 tires were "toast". Strange since neither the front or rear were anywhere near the wear bars at about 8k miles. The front brakes do have a slight pulsing (need cleaning) but were listed as "warped".

But the steering head bearings do need replacing and, more importantly, the front springs are totally sacked. Even with the pre-load cranked up the sag is still too much and it feels like I'm riding with about an inch of travel left.

So the big project this winter is to get the frontend refreshed, probably with a cartridge rebuild, along with the steering head bearings. I've already picked up some Delkevic slip-ons (SS-70s) that I'll be mounting. I'll get the suspension work done at a local shop, KFG, which has a rep for doing good suspension work. ***All comments on suspension options welcome.***

Once this is done I figure the bike will be good to go another 3-4 years (50k miles) with only gas, oil, tires, brakes & one more chain/sprocket set and all I'll have left to do is ride!
 

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Not quite what I was looking for but...Sorry to hear and glad to hear about the knee. Sorry you have to go through it, glad you're getting it done. I know plenty of folks who have and almost all are glad they did. Listen to your docs and physical therapists. DO YOUR PT! From everything I've heard, it hurts like hell but the long term gain is well worth the short term pain. Good luck.
 

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I've been through one knee reconstruction already and kinda know the drill. I tore out the ACL, MCL, and both meniscus. (Go big or go home!) As for the pain? I've never experienced pain like what I went through with that knee. It redefined my concept of pain. Multiple broken wrists, shattered arms (snowboarding), random toes, two spinal surgeries, were all a cake walk compared to the knee. But, I screwed up and have to go back under the knife. I won't rush recovery, I'll be very conservative. Usually I work as a track marshal for MotoGP but I'm gong to have to skip that this year. There's little chance I'll be able to stand on that knee for 12 hours or even run. I've even kinda written off track days for 2019. We'll see how things are August/September time frame but I doubt I'll give it a go. 2020 here I come!

Sat_IMG_12139.jpg
 

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The winter has finally set in with a vengeance here and after the holidays this year I'm going to sink a few $$$ into the '14 Ninja 1k. I just had the 50k mile service done. All the valves near the middle of spec., new chain/sprockets, plugs, etc. Their recommendations were: Tires, steering head bearings, rear brake shoes, front rotors. Steering head bearings and rear brake shoe recommendations were valid, the rest not. The mechanic wrote on the ticket the PR5 tires were "toast". Strange since neither the front or rear were anywhere near the wear bars at about 8k miles. The front brakes do have a slight pulsing (need cleaning) but were listed as "warped".

But the steering head bearings do need replacing and, more importantly, the front springs are totally sacked. Even with the pre-load cranked up the sag is still too much and it feels like I'm riding with about an inch of travel left.

So the big project this winter is to get the frontend refreshed, probably with a cartridge rebuild, along with the steering head bearings. I've already picked up some Delkevic slip-ons (SS-70s) that I'll be mounting. I'll get the suspension work done at a local shop, KFG, which has a rep for doing good suspension work. ***All comments on suspension options welcome.***

Once this is done I figure the bike will be good to go another 3-4 years (50k miles) with only gas, oil, tires, brakes & one more chain/sprocket set and all I'll have left to do is ride!
Hi Ken, good to see you're still around. I never did get back to you on Ivan restoring my engine braking on the ECU flash. You once said that if you could keep the engine braking you'd be tempted to get the flash. I'm here to tell you that if you do get Ivan's flash I'd almost guarantee you'd like it. :) Especially with your slip-ons.

I absolutely love it with the engine braking back in.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yo Squidlius, thanks for checking in. Great news and you just made Ivan some money! I've been fence sitting on the Ivan thing but your endorsment has pushed me over. I just keep looking at the torque curve in the 3-6k rpm range (where I spend a fair amount of my time) and re-reading all the rave reviews but thinking about the braking issue and waffling but now, I'm just going to git'er done.

Happy Holidays man! Hope Santa is good to you and yours.
 

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Hi Ken,

Thanks for the report on your 50K service. What great engines :righton:

On suspension, from reading threads here, I went with Traxxion Dynamics re-work on my rear shock, and when it comes to the front suspension, I'll consider going with Traxxion Dynamics upgrades again.

You mentioned tires, I've had bad experience with Michelin PR3 and PR4 on the N1K and other bikes -- fronts cupping and rears squaring off -- and messing up the handling. Now I'm happy with Dunlop Roadsmart III, 2K miles, so far, so good. Just my experience, of course.

On front brake pulsing, it's very annoying on my bike (10K miles) when coming to a stop, like 15mph and below. I have taken to using light front brake lever pressure and using the rear at the same time at low speeds. I have found that no amount of cleaning, scrubbing, or sanding of the rotors makes it go away. New Vesrah pads installed, too. Other threads here talk about rotor "hard spots" and ways to deal with them. For now, I plan to live with and work around the pulsing, and consider aftermarket rotors if needed.

No knee work needed here (not yet, anyway), but hernia repair last summer has given me a new lease on life :righton:

Kurt
 

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Kenors, you'll crap yourself when you have that fork re-done. The bike really handles well, after, and ...well, like so many have said, its a new machine after the rebuild.

I have had two projects, so far. I switched out my rear brake to a brembo p32 unit. I also did something that felt really stupid, but ended up being ok. As I was on ebay, I noticed one listing was for a "z1000" rearset,but it was priced a bit higher than the normal, chinese rearset. These were 118.00 and they wanted another 20, or so, for shipping. I hit "buy it now" and waited the ten days for them to arrive.

When they arrived, I could see they were well made and damn near a 100% copy of Rizomas. The packaging was well done. No fake boxes, but they used plenty of foam. No idea why these were listed as only fitting the z 1000. I wish they had left the logo off..... I had to buy new bolts to go from the rearset to frame (m8x20mm) as well as the two for my master cylinder (m8x20 and 1 m8x25) No instructions..go figure....This ticked me off. I was doing this install on xmas eve and no one in the world was going to overnight m8 hardware. I was really happy/surprised when my local Lowes store ended up having an amazing section of m8 hardware, in stainless..perfect. I bought "5" m8x20 and the one m8x25, although the 20mm length would have been fine for the upper master cylinder bolt, too. You need the socket head bolts for this, due to how they are machined.

I used plenty of loctite as I installed them, but so far I have few complaints. They shorted me a 5mm "c" clip that went to the brake pin clevis, so I had to obtain one of those from the hobby shop. The footpeg springs are soft, but I stretched them and they are ok, now..

The fit and finish is damn near perfect. I really dont think id gain anything from the real 600.00 dollar rearsets, except those would have allowed me to keep my pride and dignity......no, seriously, I hate this knock off crap, but these appear to be the exception. Here it is , installed, I since went back in and set the shift linkage properly and made both pegs the same. This was a "test fit" picture. Even the brake light hardware fell into place and did not need adjustment.

Im really not sure what to say. I detest this knock off garbage, but if your goign to do it, do it right, and these guys did. The fake rizoma pegs are amazing. They grip like crazy. The ability to move the pegs around will be nice.

I'll go through the rear brake caliper swap, if anyone is interested in that. Heres the link to my fake "rizoma" rearsets...complete with "rizoma logo". They show them in gold color, but his link is for the black ones. I dont know if these would be ok on an abs bike..I assume so, but no real idea if it would. There were no issues on my 2012, non abs, except the missing hardware.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/For-14-16-Kawasaki-Z1000-CNC-Aluminum-Motorcycle-Rearset-Footrest-Foot-Pegs-Set/273501964897?epid=25024674149&hash=item3fadfcca61:g:l~MAAOSwNWhbvc0V:rk:10:pf:0
 

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Heres a pic of the brake side....You would never fool anyone who knew Rizoma. The rearset is a copy of their "evo" rearset, but the shift and brake lever are different from how Rizoma really does it.

The highlight here is the return spring for the brake. The include a spring and guides that fit the master cylinder and it works VERY well. It would be a nice upgrade, in and of itself. The stock ninja master cylinder is silver. I switched mine out because of my brake caliper project, so its black.
 

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On front brake pulsing, it's very annoying on my bike (10K miles) when coming to a stop, like 15mph and below. I have taken to using light front brake lever pressure and using the rear at the same time at low speeds. I have found that no amount of cleaning, scrubbing, or sanding of the rotors makes it go away. New Vesrah pads installed, too. Other threads here talk about rotor "hard spots" and ways to deal with them. For now, I plan to live with and work around the pulsing, and consider aftermarket rotors if needed.


Kurt
Iv'e heard that when you put on new brake pads that you need to immediately break them in by doing several hard brakings in rapid succession. Anybody know whether that is true?
 

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I dotn know how many sets of brake pads I purchased. Vesrah pads feel very forgiving on a poor break in......Galfer, not so much. I Will swear I have better ...well, better everything when I break the pads in like this. Lots of words, but easy to do:

https://www.motostuff.com/tech-tips-bedding-in-your-brakes
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Great reference rcannon409 (as usual). For our short attention span readers :) consider:

Useful information in the above mentioned link: https://www.motostuff.com/tech-tips-bedding-in-your-brakes

Read the entire article if you want to know what's going on and all about brake pad materials, etc. If you just want to change your pads and break them in, read on:

"The Bedding in Process: The basic process of bedding in pads and rotors is to accelerate your bike up to 40-50 mph (about half throttle in 4th or 5th gear) and bring the bike down to about 5 mph by applying the brakes at about 60-80% stopping power. Cruise back to your starting point to allow some cool down time between braking runs. Do this about 10-15 times and gradually work your way up to applying maximum braking force without locking up the tires or coming to a complete stop."
 

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Great reference rcannon409 (as usual). For our short attention span readers <img src="http://www.RiderForums.com/images/smilies/smile1.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smilie" class="inlineimg" /> consider:

Useful information in the above mentioned link: https://www.motostuff.com/tech-tips-bedding-in-your-brakes

Read the entire article if you want to know what's going on and all about brake pad materials, etc. If you just want to change your pads and break them in, read on:

"The Bedding in Process: The basic process of bedding in pads and rotors is to accelerate your bike up to 40-50 mph (about half throttle in 4th or 5th gear) and bring the bike down to about 5 mph by applying the brakes at about 60-80% stopping power. Cruise back to your starting point to allow some cool down time between braking runs. Do this about 10-15 times and gradually work your way up to applying maximum braking force without locking up the tires or coming to a complete stop."
One thing I always do while bedding new pads/rotors is to not hold the brake on while waiting in traffic, etc. until they are fully bedded. You run the risk of getting uneven build up, making the brakes pulse.
 

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Maybe this is the winter I finally finish the Z750S. It has only been four years and a hundred iterations. More than likely it is finishing my GSXR1000 track bike though.
 
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