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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2000 (new) ZR-7 and I've finally reached the time for the initial service check (586miles). Here's my question; Is the initial check really worth it. Every shop I checked with said it was 5 hrs labor (per kawasaki's book) and it would be $300 plus parts. I've read over the owner's manual, and I can do everything except the valve check (and it would probably only cost me less than $50). I did get in touch with one reputable bike shop and the sevice technician suggested that I NOT take it in. He stated that all they really do is nothing more than what I would do for routine maintenance. He also said that as far as the valves were concerned, if the bike was running good and a basic compression test checked out, they didn't even remove the heads to check the valves. He said that I shouldn't really need to take the bike in for a valve check until around 6000 miles. However, he did mention that I needed to change the oil, etc... just to get new fluids in bike. Based on this, I feel that I should just do all the normal maintenance I would normally perform every few thousand miles and just wait on taking it in for later. What I basically got from him was that if there was not a problem with the bike, they basically just did a normal inspection/fluids change.

What is everyone's opinion on this?

Keep in mind that my bike runs great and I do all of my own basic maintenance and I really don't want to spend $300+ on unneccessary maintenance.

Thanks in advance.

max:)
 

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Hi Max,

That is what I'm doing. Mine has about 2,800 miles on it and still runs perfect. I do all my own maintenance. Yes I skipped the valve check.

Here are a couple of things you might consider doing.

1) Tighten your exhaust nuts at the head.
2) Lube your gear shift levers by removing the side cover and linkage.
3) Lube the zirk fittings on the rear suspension.
4) Adjust your throttle cable.
5) Adjust your idle mixture screws to 2.5 turns.
6) Check you tire pressure regularly.
7) Change your oil & filter again at 1,500 miles.
8) Clean, lube and adjust your chain.

Hope this helps...

Andy
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks,
Actually, I just got off the phone with my original dealer and there service dept. Agreed with you (they actually said NOT to take it in)! They also said that if your bike was running well, not to even worry about a valve check until around 6000miles. They also informed me that bypassing the initial service would NOT void the warranty (as long as I had records of maintence; even if not performed by a dealer).

I'll change my oil/filter and do a good general check this weekend.

Thanks again.
 

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Max,the way the valve train is set up from the factory it probably is fine,but...In the mid 80's i worked for a Kaw.&Suke dealership and we always checked the valves if they brought them in for the 500 mile service. Usually they were fine,but i have seen several 550,650,750,1000 Kawasaki's that did need the valves adjusted.Do yourself a favor and buy a service manual and at least check them..it really is not rocket science..even a not so fair mechanic can pop the cover off and check everything and button it all up in three hours.Now if it needs adjusting you will probably want someone with a little more experience to help you out,but that depends on how confident you are working on things.At the end of the day you will feel better for it.It's your call. mike
 

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I've pondered over who should do my valve adjustments. Basicly, it came down to 2 options

A. At 500 miles, I could have the dealer do ONLY a valve check and adjustment, for $200-$300, plus parts and I do the rest of the maintenance. If the valves did not need any adjustment, then I threw a bunch of $$$ in the toilet.

B. At 500 miles, I do all the maintenance myself and check the valves myself. If the clearances are fine, then I saved $$$. If I have some valves that require adjustment, then I can take it to the mechanic or I can adjust it myself by calculating the proper shim size that I will require.

Personally, I'd go with option-B. When owning a motorcycle, it is a bonding thing when you gut your engine and do maintenance on it. You may feel uneasy about dismantling a $6000 machine, but this is the way you get to know the inner workings of your MC. With a few maintenance sessions under your belt, you feel more confident about your abilities and you ultimately become one with the machine.

Motorcycles, for the most part, are not rocket science and this is realized once you get inside of them. Most likely, you don't use your MC for regular commuting. So, if you do if you screw it up, then you'll just be missing some liesure time while you fix it or have a mechanic fix it (if things got really messed up).

If you think you are up to the task, start with some easy maintenance and build upon that. You may be surprised at how much you are able to do.
 
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