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I have to ask why you think you need a temp gauge?

What is that going to change regarding the way you ride your bike?

Are you concerned with the engine taking too long to come up to temperature? Do the thermobob addition.
Concerned that it is going to overheat? Listen for the fan. If it runs constantly more than 5 minutes, pull over and rest, or get out of town and enjoy the back roads.

Some of my bikes have temp gauges from the factory, but never had them tell me anything I needed, so don't see what the need is.
 

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I have been a service tech for over 30 years and it is just a pet peeve to not be able to observe all possible critical characteristics of an engine I am in control of. I did order the (Themo-Bob 4) from Bill at Watt-man, I also will order a Trail Tech TTO Temp Meter 723-ES2 1/8X28 BSPP Screw Sensor that does fit the Thermo-Bob 4 precisely.
 

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I have to ask why you think you need a temp gauge?

What is that going to change regarding the way you ride your bike?

Are you concerned with the engine taking too long to come up to temperature? Do the thermobob addition.
Concerned that it is going to overheat? Listen for the fan. If it runs constantly more than 5 minutes, pull over and rest, or get out of town and enjoy the back roads.

Some of my bikes have temp gauges from the factory, but never had them tell me anything I needed, so don't see what the need is.
No temp gauge? When it comes to cars, I would NOT buy one without a temp gauge, no matter how much I liked about the rest of the vehicle. IMO, that's the most important gauge of all in a water cooled vehicle. It helps to show cooling problems early. Cooling problems are the MOST common vehicle failures of water cooled engines. The temp gauge can show when your thermostat is stuck open or is getting flakey, for an example. And you can find the problem before it sticks closed, which is a lot more serious than being stuck open.

I had no idea the Versy had no temp gauge. But does it at least have a idiot light to tell you when it is overheated?

To me, that is a BIG negative to not have a temp gauge on a liquid cooled engine.


While listening to an electric fan is a good idea for overheating (if you can hear it while riding!), how do you tell then the thermostat is stuck open? Perhaps a performance problem that will seem like it's another problem?

On an air cooled engine, it is not important, as there isn't much to break in the cooling system (such as with my 71 BMW). But with liquid cooling, it's the most important gauge of all, IMO.

-Don- SSF, CA
 

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The Kawasaki 650s have a warning light for engine overheating.

They do not have a coolant temperature gauge, likely to keep the price lower.

A higher compression ZX-6R is much more likely to overheat in slow city traffic on a hot day, compared to a 650 twin. I have had my ZZR600 overheat warning light come on twice in slow traffic on hot days, and it also has a coolant temperature gauge that some turn off so they can see a clock instead.

Very few new cars have a temperature gauge; they have a check engine light for smaller problems and an overheat warning light.
 

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The Kawasaki 650s have a warning light for engine overheating.

They do not have a coolant temperature gauge, likely to keep the price lower.

A higher compression ZX-6R is much more likely to overheat in slow city traffic on a hot day, compared to a 650 twin. I have had my ZZR600 overheat warning light come on twice in slow traffic on hot days, and it also has a coolant temperature gauge that some turn off so they can see a clock instead.

Very few new cars have a temperature gauge; they have a check engine light for smaller problems and an overheat warning light.
I have not looked at any newer cars lately, all mine are at least 13 years old, but every one of them has a temp gauge, but that is probably because if no temp gauge, I just won't buy the car. It's these rather small things I look for first in any vehicle purchase.

While I am very disappointed the Versy 650LT has no temp gauge (I would rather pay a few hundred bucks more) it's other features will outweigh it, in this case. Things like it's great fuel range on a tank and its high ground clearance and stuff like that in a lighter bike. Unless there is another bike out there with these features that also has a temp gauge.

I don't like the idiot lights that give no advance warning. However, there are some warning lights that are MUCH better than a gauge. Such as GM's old alternator light (late 1980's). Has nothing but advantages over only having a meter. For one thing (of many) you see it the very second the belt breaks. But there is no way that a light can give an early warning for a thermostat problem or whatever.

But has anybody here seen the Versy 650 overheat light come on? And for what reason?

If it's reliable enough, perhaps there is no issue. But usually cooling problems are the most common problems of any in a water-cooled engine.

-Don- SSF, CA
 

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I have had my ZZR600 overheat warning light come on twice in slow traffic on hot days, and it also has a coolant temperature gauge that some turn off so they can see a clock instead.
I would think the electric fan would prevent overheating in slow traffic. Is the fan too small for the radiator? Sounds like it.

BTW, in my 1984 Venture, I added a switch so I can turn on the cooling fan at any time. And I have an indicator for when the fan is running. It has a temp gauge and the difference is quite notable when the fan is forced on full time, espcally when riding very slow such as uphill on an unpaved road on a hot day.

-Don- SSF, CA
 
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