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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)


Kawasaki introduces a new mid-level streetfighter with aggressive styling, smooth acceleration and sporty, stable handling for back-road fun

The aggressive styling and powerful punch of the Kawasaki Z1000 has won it many fans, and now it gets a sibling in the form of the new-to-North America 2016 Kawasaki Z800 ABS. This mid-level streetfighter brings the same attitude as its bigger brother, with similarly aggressive styling, sportbike heritage and a powerful 806cc four-cylinder engine. Whether it’s being used on back roads for a Sunday fun run or city streets, the stripped down style and sporty handling will deliver grin-inducing performance. What’s more, it is delivered with Kawasaki’s legendary reliability and durability.
The 2016 Kawasaki Z800 ABS is a 49-state model, which will not be available in California but can be purchased in every other state.

SPECIAL FEATURES OF THE 2016 KAWASAKI Z800 ABS
• Aggressive, stripped down streetfighter styling
• Reliable and torquey 806cc four-cylinder water-cooled engine
• Smooth power delivery with strong performance at high RPM
• Sporty, stable steering thanks to responsive chassis geometry
• Natural riding position ideally suited to back-road fun or city commuting
• Adjustable KYB front and rear suspension allows the rider to tailor the handling
• Modern instrumentation provides plenty of information with stylish design
• Legendary Kawasaki reliability, durability and build quality


ENGINE & TRANSMISSION
The 806cc, DOHC, liquid-cooled, 16-valve engine boasts strong performance in the mid-range where most street bikes spend their time. Its fuel injection system combines ultra-fine injectors with 34mm Keihin throttle bodies and sub-throttles that offer smooth response across the rev-range. It also has two different length intake funnels to optimize airflow at various engine speeds, providing good response, no matter what the speed.

The exhaust system has large radius curved header pipes to make them as long as possible, while equalizer tubes connect header pipes 1 and 4 as well as 2 and 3. Both these measures are designed to provide superb low to mid RPM engine response. An exhaust valve is positioned upstream of the muffler entrance to help “tune” the back-pressure waves for enhanced response in the same low-mid range. Finally, a short-style exhaust system eliminates the center pipe and uses a short muffler to aid mass centralization and present a strong streetfighter image. The muffler’s complex cross-section allows good lean angles while meeting the necessary noise regulations, although it has been tuned to give a more aggressive sound to suit the motorcycle’s character.

For durability, the engine uses wide radius crankshaft journals as well as large 1.2mm piston-cooling oil jets and a low-friction camshaft chain to reduce operating friction.
In the smooth-shifting six-speed transmission, short overall gearing complements the responsive engine to deliver impressive thrust on command. When the road opens up, the stylish streetfighter can stretch its legs thanks to a tall sixth gear that maintains a more comfortable cruising RPM for highway riding.

CHASSIS
The Z800 features a high-tensile steel tubular backbone frame for rigidity. It also has a steel swingarm and lightweight cast aluminum engine subframe. The latter allows the front engine mounts to be positioned behind the cylinders, close to the engine’s center of gravity. This helps to reduce engine vibration (particularly through the handlebars), contributing greatly to ride
quality. The inclusion of the engine
subframe allows
the frame
construction to be
slimmer, contributing to
its overall rigidity.

A brace is used to join the front of the engine
subframes (from left
to right), again providing ideal frame rigidity, particular in torsional rigidity for increased handling stability.
Kawasaki engineers then used a combination of rigid and rubber mounts so the chassis delivers a planted feeling with a high level of feedback. The result is a superb level of control, with the rider easily able to understand what the bike is doing.

Building on this sturdy platform, the chassis geometry has resulted in nimble, responsive handling together with great stability. The motorcycle’s stance is forward leaning, with the rear raised slightly to further contribute to the aggressive posture of this muscular streetfighter.

SUSPENSION & BRAKES
Suspension duties are handled by an inverted 41mm KYB fork up front. It is adjustable for rebound damping and preload, allowing the rider to fine-tune the characteristics to suit their favorite roads.
At the rear, the Kawasaki Uni-Trak® suspension system includes a KYB shock with a piggyback reservoir. Like the front, the stepless rebound damping adjuster allows the rear shock’s performance to be tuned to match changes to the spring preload or passenger loads.

The 2016 Kawasaki Z800 suspension has been set up so that whether you’re hammering along deserted back roads or prowling pothole-infested city streets, the motorcycle will remain poised, predictable and entertaining. The brakes on the Z800 include dual opposed four-piston front brake calipers offering progressive stopping power and feel. The system uses 277mm petal-type front rotors and a lightweight Nissin ABS unit. A 216mm petal-type rotor and single-piston caliper provide good rear brake feel for maximum finesse. The power and progressive feel of the brakes at both ends provide supreme confidence when slowing the bike from speed. The Z800’s standard anti-lock brake system (ABS) promotes additional confidence when riding in slippery conditions.

The wheels are six-spoke supersport-style units manufactured using the latest lightweight production technology. Not only do they help reduce unsprung mass, which allows the suspension to function better, but also carry the latest Dunlop Sportmax D214 radial tires. The result is superb grip, precise handling and extended tread life.

BODYWORK & STYLING
The sculpted styling of the Z800 is one of its most stunning aspects. The thin, compact headlight cowl was positioned as low as possible, extending the line that starts from the top of the tank and drops down to create a menacing “face” with its angular lines. The fierce appearance is one of the key styling elements of the aggressive design. From the side, the curvature of the upper engine shrouds combine with the chiseled lower cowl to create a distinctive shape. The designers intended for these parts to appear to grip the engine, creating the image of a predator holding prey in its mouth.

The visual weight of the front is contrasted by the sleek rear, which features a slim tail section, contributing greatly to the Z800’s aggressive mass-forward stance. And finally, the narrow proportions of the LED tail light add visual interest.

Although not strictly a styling element, the Z800 incorporates useful luggage hooks. These can be found on the neat design of the rear footpegs, as well as behind the license plate holder. Both sets of hooks allow luggage to be secured using tiedowns or bungee straps.

STREETFIGHTER DETAILS
The Kawasaki designers went to great lengths to create elements that would reinforce the streetfighter theme of the 2016 Kawasaki Z800 ABS. These include the characteristic naked engine, which has black engine covers that are a key visual element. Furthermore, the attractive bends in the exhaust header pipes
add to the appeal of
a “naked” motorcycle, especially with their “buffed” finish that bring added visual interest.

Other streetfighter elements include the handlebar, which has a flatter bend than a sportbike handlebar, and the risers ensure the grip position is wider, giving the rider more leverage and allowing an upright yet sporty riding position.

Details such as the inner rear fender are another clue to this motorcycle’s purpose, helping to keep the under-tail and rear suspension less cluttered, more pared down, as a streetfighter should be. It all adds up to the perfect style and ergonomics for maximum agility without sacrificing comfort.

CONTROLS
The Z800’s futuristic looking instrument panel features three LCD screens in an angular housing that echoes the motorcycle’s edgy styling. The central LCD display contains an altimeter-style tachometer. In fact, three tachometer display patterns are available, allowing riders to customize the display to suit their preference.

In addition, there is a speedometer, odometer, clock, dual trip meters, engine temperature, fuel gauge, remaining range, as well as an Economical Riding Indicator. The latter illuminates when the user is riding efficiently, reducing the motorcycle’s fuel consumption and increasing its range.

The 2016 Kawasaki Z800 is equipped with a standard electronic immobilizer, which is built into the standard ignition key. The key operates conventionally, but the engine won’t start without the correct key being used. The system is fully integrated and requires no additional action from the rider, but will help to protect the motorcycle from theft.

ABOUT KAWASAKI
Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) started full-scale production of motorcycles over a half century ago. The first Kawasaki motorcycle engine was designed based on technical know-how garnered from the development and production of aircraft engines, and Kawasaki’s entry into the motorcycle industry was driven by the company’s constant effort to develop new technologies. Numerous new Kawasaki models introduced over the years have helped shape the market, and in the process have created enduring legends based on their unique engineering, power, design and riding pleasure. In the future, Kawasaki's commitment to maintaining and furthering these strengths will surely give birth to new legends.

Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A. (KMC) markets and distributes Kawasaki motorcycles, ATVs, side x sides, and Jet Ski® watercraft through a network of approximately 1,100 independent retailers, with close to an additional 7,700 retailers specializing in general purpose engines. KMC and its affiliates employ nearly 3,100 people in the United States, with approximately 300 of them located at KMC's Irvine, California headquarters.

Kawasaki’s tagline, “Let the good times roll.®”, is recognized worldwide. The Kawasaki brand is synonymous with powerful, stylish and category-leading vehicles. Information about Kawasaki’s complete line of powersports products and Kawasaki affiliates can be found on the Internet at Kawasaki Motorcycles, ATV, SxS, Jet Ski Personal Watercraft.


Pricing: 2016 Z800 ABS: $8,399
 

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Nice! Hope it sells well.
 

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California has slightly different emissions regs that are tough to deal with. You'll notice our Kawasaki cal editions have a vapor canister attached to the fuel tank, and there may be other slight differences.

Unless a manufacturer is willing to be sales will support these changes, its easier to just not sell there. Or, if th ebike is very popular, sometimes you'll see the the next years machine being so equipped.

Doubtful here as this bike has been available for a long time, overseas. I dont see them changing a global bike just to be cal eligible.
 

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Good to see it back in the U.S. The z750 was only available for 2 years before they pulled it. I bought a 2004 then upgraded to the N1K when it came out.

American attitudes towards standards needs to change though before any of these bikes will be high volume sellers.
 

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Don't know why such a difference. Typo maybe? It's been mentioned in a couple other places. I really like the look of the bike. I'd definitely consider it.
 

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The new and improved ER-8N! Sweet. I hope this bike causes all the naked wanters to compromise and buy my ER-6n used for half the cost in a couple months. :)

2009 Blue ER-6n with new some pod scratches from PO. 3000 miles. Just broke in by a mature rider. Make me a PM offer.
 

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A couple more ponies and a little more torque, which we could get on our 750s with not all that much modification, only preload and rebound suspension adjustments, and it weighs 20+ pounds more wet. I didn't think the oem suspension/brakes were up to the power my current bike has, the new one is hopefully set up better but you can't design a suspension for all sizes of people so to me adjustability is really important. I'd be more interested if they built a z800r with the showa radial setup and a rear that had high/low compression adjustments, the weight is also to much it weighs more than the original N1K (I think my brother in laws 2011 was listed at 503 lbs.) I'll be waiting for enough money to buy a 1000, not a big enough improvement to trade in my 07 for. It would be shinier though at 72,000 km. mine is showing a few nicks here and there.
 

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My apologize, I am not trying to sound rude or inconsiderate of this Z800.

I just don't get the real competition Kawi is going for here.

Naked style? Okay, awesome! But naked style streetfighter at around 500 ish lbs? I don't get that. The Z1000SX weighs as much as this bike and has a load more power and better overall parts.
Besides price, is there really a reason to buy this over the Ninja 1k models? Not really, other than originality because no one has one of these on the U.S roads. But other than that, it's pointless to pick one of these up as far as value and performance is concerned.


It's a real bummer that Kawi isn't considering a California model. Or maybe they are, but don't want to deal with it.

The Yamaha FZ-09 is the only real direct contender/competition I can see here. However the FZ-09 is lighter, has as much power and torque and is around the same price. So what direct competition is Kawi going after here?


I love the look of the Z800 however, and I would be very interested in a faired version, any rumors/news on one?
 

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What Kawasaki really should build is a 750>800 cc. triple with an all aluminium frame 450ish lbs. wet (maybe 3/4 of a zx10 engine with the normal retuning that helps low/ midrange power and torque) with premium suspension and brakes, or at least an r version with the option for that, in 2 versions naked and half faired. I know that would sell this side of the pond, but it'd probably kill sales for the z1k and n1k so they won't. I don't necessarily think a standard needs to outperform a super sport but it should still handle being pushed near the limits better than the current crop of standards out there, exceptions are the aprilia and bmw nakeds. It seems to me the middleweights are a forgotten segment of the market, you can choose super sport or beginners bike not much else out there. The fz9 is the right weight but is 900 cc. really a middleweight? And it still has budget suspenders. The z1k and n1k are still better options (they could be lighter though) for the types of riding I do mostly b highways with as many corners on them as I can find, I like a fairly agile bike that isn't so light that it's no good for touring comfortably on, with enough power to stimulate the giggle process occasionally, wait a minute for $1000 I could make my 750 a 1000cc bike and I'd have that, guess I won't be buying a $9000 dollar new one anytime soon, <--- this is the kind of thinking that Kawasaki should be considering when introducing new/old models over here otherwise they'll do the same sales with bikes like the z800 as they did with the z750/z750s
 

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Drguru , you said it yourself. Cost.

Less money to buy. Less money to insure.

I mean, why buy anything under 1000cc. You don't have to use all that power until you want to.
 

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Its the zr7 reincarnated. Personally, I like the look way better than the Z1000. Plus, there is more interest/competition in the 800 displacement level for "streetfighters". Yes, its heavy, but I would buy one. Compare Brutale, Monster, etc. for street fighter.

Plus, they already had it in the Euro line, so just have to ship it here as an existing model. It will sell, maybe not hotcake level, but viva la difference.
 

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Plus, they already had it in the Euro line, so just have to ship it here as an existing model. It will sell, maybe not hotcake level, but viva la difference.
And the full line of rimoza custom bits available for it already.
 

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Drguru , you said it yourself. Cost.

Less money to buy. Less money to insure.

I mean, why buy anything under 1000cc. You don't have to use all that power until you want to.

Lol I guess price is definitely a big concern for most buyers, me included.

But what I'm also asking, is what is it's direct competition? The Fz 09 right?

Specs vs Specs, the fz 09 is far better in value for the price. I mean, essentially, these two mentioned are hooligan bikes, so commuting and touring wouldn't be on the buyers primary list for purchasing, right? They want a bike capable of stunts, twisties, power and comfort while doing so.

So what does the Z800 have over the FZ?

That's my concern, it doesn't look like it's putting the FZ in a corner, at all.
 

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Lol I guess price is definitely a big concern for most buyers, me included.

But what I'm also asking, is what is it's direct competition? The Fz 09 right?

Specs vs Specs, the fz 09 is far better in value for the price. I mean, essentially, these two mentioned are hooligan bikes, so commuting and touring wouldn't be on the buyers primary list for purchasing, right? They want a bike capable of stunts, twisties, power and comfort while doing so.

So what does the Z800 have over the FZ?

That's my concern, it doesn't look like it's putting the FZ in a corner, at all.
Have you ridden the FZ09? I have and was not impressed. If these two bikes are indeed direct competitors, one has to weigh all the components before determining value for the price. The FZ09 has budget suspension, poor fueling, and passes a lot of vibes on to the rider. I am not familiar with the Z800, but if it has better fueling, better suspension, less vibes, then it may be a better all around package. Or it may just be that Kawasaki is bringing it here because it is so popular in Europe and they want to see if can sell. Might end up being a one or two year bike which is why they are not bothering to put out a California model.

We, in the US get quite a few one or two year bikes because it is hard for the manufacturers to figure out what we will buy besides cruisers. The Europeans do more commuting on bikes than the Americans.
 

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Looks like a Z1000 permanently stuck in low power mode to me. I guess it's cheaper which is appealing but it seems like too much crossover between the 2 bikes. I wonder if the Z1000 is on its way out?
 
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