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I recently purchased my 650r off of craigslist. The bike ran great for a few weeks with myself toying around on it. The gas cap does not open on the bike as it is "frozen," and when the bike is completely off it makes a hissing noise. After a few days of making this noise I attempted to start the bike and the battery had died, so I jumped it and it turned on no problem. I went and got a new battery and it started up no problem on its own. Three days after it will not turn on again. What is going on and what can I expect repair costs to be?

Thanks
 

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I would echo GRYMM's comments and question. There is a pump/motor that - I believe - exists to either relieve or normalise the pressure in the fuel tank, and can be mistaken for a hissing sound - I did at first when I bought my '14 Ninja, but is more likely to be a electrical whining sound of a weak-powered pump/motor.

This noise is most notable on my bike when it's a hot day and I've jostled the tank around a bit while moving the bike when it's off, or after a long ride in pretty hot weather(30c and up is when it's more likely to happen). That all being said, if as you stated the sound occurs - and this is an assumption based on your wording - for multiple days without stopping, that would most certainly account for a dead battery after a couple of days with such a constant drain and no charging.

The culprit could be a dodgy sensor somewhere(I would hazard a guess as there needing to be a sensor for the pressure) or that fact that your fuel cap has seized is more likely to be the culprit. The fuel cap is where the tank breathes, and if it's seized, it's quite likely the breather hole has become completely blocked causing a constant pressure inadequacy thus causing a constant attempt by the bike to fix it and in turn draining your battery every time you turn the bike off.

Here are some related threads about it;

http://www.riderforums.com/z1k-z750-maintenance/29462-tank-vent-question.html

http://www.riderforums.com/ninja-650r-maintenance/31175-whining-noise-tank.html

http://www.riderforums.com/general-ninja-650r/69223-dumb-gas-tank-question.html

https://www.ninjette.org/forums/showthread.php?t=46577

-SM
 

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Not sure what you mean by saying the cap is frozen. I assume it opens and you can fill up? If the bike runs when you crank it and doesn't stop during a ride, it is likely nothing of concern. If the vent was clogged, the bike would seem to run out of gas, then start again after you open the tank or wait a while for it to slowly vent through a partially blocked vent line.

I'm guessing the dead battery problem has nothing to do with the gas tank concerns. Are there any electric accessories on the bike? Are there any extra leads coming off the battery or from the fuse box? Heated grips? If you have a new battery and with a volt ohm meter you have 14.2 volt reading or higher while the bike is running, then the charging is probably okay and the problem is something continues to draw current after you stop.

Does the 2012 have a parking brake setting on the key if you turn it off and turn the key one step beyond normal off that keeps the tail light on? Could have done this accidentally. Hope it is something easy like that.

Hope you get this all worked out so you can enjoy your new to you machine and ride with confidence.
 

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I would echo GRYMM's comments and question. There is a pump/motor that - I believe - exists to either relieve or normalise the pressure in the fuel tank, and can be mistaken for a hissing sound - I did at first when I bought my '14 Ninja, but is more likely to be a electrical whining sound of a weak-powered pump/motor.
There is no pump dedicated to the pressure in the fuel tank. Are you talking about the fuel pump whine when you first turn the key to the ON position but before starting the engine? That whine is the fuel pump priming.

The fuel cap has a little nipple on the underside that connects to a tube (open your fuel cap and you'll see it). In the California model, we have a carbon canister filled with charcoal. The tube from the fuel cap leads to the charcoal canister. A tube goes from the charcoal canister to a solenoid, and another tube goes from that solenoid to the throttle bodies. If you do not have a California model motorcycle, the tube from the fuel cap just vents to the atmosphere.

The purpose of the carbon canister is to trap gas fumes until they can be burned off. Fuel evaporates at a low temperature, and rather than just releasing it to the atmosphere so that it can destroy the ozone layer (or into your garage where you might have a gas water heater that could possibly ignite the gas fumes), the charcoal in the carbon canister is used to trap the fumes. While the engine is on, depending on conditions, it will tell the solenoid to open. The vacuum in the throttle bodies will then suck the gas fumes from the carbon canister.

The underside of the carbon canister has its own air filter. When there is a vacuum in the fuel tank, air is sucked into it through the carbon canister. This is how the fuel tank is vented. As mentioned above, if you don't have a carbon canister, the tube from the fuel cap vents to the atmosphere.

Usually the fuel tank undergoes negative pressure. As the engine uses up fuel and the fuel level decreases, a vacuum is created. You may have seen fuel tanks that look crushed because they crumpled under pressure. A fuel tank may also experience positive pressure, such as when it is under the sun and the fuel inside is warmed up.

This noise is most notable on my bike when it's a hot day and I've jostled the tank around a bit while moving the bike when it's off, or after a long ride in pretty hot weather(30c and up is when it's more likely to happen). That all being said, if as you stated the sound occurs - and this is an assumption based on your wording - for multiple days without stopping, that would most certainly account for a dead battery after a couple of days with such a constant drain and no charging.
The fuel tank venting via tubes (and the carbon canister) is passive. There is no pump/motor that runs while the motorcycle is off which could lead to battery drain.

The culprit could be a dodgy sensor somewhere(I would hazard a guess as there needing to be a sensor for the pressure) or that fact that your fuel cap has seized is more likely to be the culprit. The fuel cap is where the tank breathes, and if it's seized, it's quite likely the breather hole has become completely blocked causing a constant pressure inadequacy thus causing a constant attempt by the bike to fix it and in turn draining your battery every time you turn the bike off.
There is no sensor for fuel tank pressure. If the pressure is negative (vacuum), air is sucked in via the breather tube (and carbon canister) to equalize the pressure. If the pressure is positive, the excess pressure would be vented/released.

On old motorcycles, fuel caps had tiny holes in them so that they could breathe. I'm not sure about the older generation Ninja 650s, but the 2012+ ones do not vent directly to the atmosphere. As mentioned above, they have a nipple that leads to a breather tube. I have disassembled and reassembled my fuel cap (I was trying to track down the cause of my vapor lock symptoms, hence the reason why I know all of the tube routing and parts for the system). The fuel cap is really neat to look inside. It holds the pressure in with several springs. When the pressure builds, it pushes up a small cylindrical object. The fumes go through a series of channels until they reach the nipple. There is also a small screen in there for when there is a vacuum and air is being sucked into the fuel tank.

A common issue with gas caps is that they become stuck. Either the key breaks off into the lock, or perhaps the motorcycle was dropped before and some liquid fuel got into the gas cap's locking mechanism and then dried up/solidified. Unfortunately there is no easy way to remove a stuck gas cap since you need to open it to unscrew a hidden screw. OP may need to drill out the lock (preferably with the fuel tank removed and drained). Past the keyhole are two springs that push two metal pieces outward (to keep the cap locked). Once those springs are destroyed or moved out of place, OP could then maybe reach in and pull the metal pieces inward.

OP, unless you have some sort of parasitic draw, I think your issue may be somewhere in the charging system. Unless your new battery is a dud, it seems like your motorcycle isn't charging it back up. For the mean time, you could use a battery tender to charge the battery while you're at home, but this is a short-term solution since if you are riding to far away locations, you may drain your battery and become stranded somewhere.
 

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In regards to the "whine" sound and there being no pump in relation to the fuel tank pressure, I was not referring to the fuel pump priming which I know happens for the first 2-3 seconds of turning the key to 'on', if you read the threads I linked you'd know what I was referring to.

The whine I mentioned you can hear - at least on all '14 650's I've encountered - is triggered by the pressure in the fuel tank, positive or negative I know not. It will happen periodically when the fuel tank is exposed to the sun for an extended period of time due to the heat, or on warm days after a lengthy ride jostling the tank about after turning the bike off can trigger it.

Perhaps this sound is not electrical in nature, but it certainly sounds like it, and because the OP described a sound reminiscent of that when the pressure is being returned to normal(and after turning the bike off, while the sound persists) is why I mentioned it.

-SM
 

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I just fixed a frozen gas cap. I let it soak in wd40 for a day to no avail, since this only lubes the lock cylinder. Usually, the 2 tabs inside the tank that retract when you turn the key are the culprit for a stuck gas cap. The way I ended up opening it was by drilling a pilot hole in the corner of the cylinder, then taking a pick and pulling the cylinder in the direction its supposed to turn while pressing down on the cap and turning the key. It also helped to smack the gas cap with a rubber mallet a couple of times. If that doesn't work, I remember watching a youtube video about a guy using a DA sander to vibrate any particulate matter loose from the inside of the gas cap! Might be worth a try?

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