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best motorcycle tires online

This is a discussion on best motorcycle tires online within the Kawi ZX-10R/ZX-6R forums, part of the Other Bikes category; I think there's no better feeling than being on a bike. I ride a Kawasaki Ninja ZX10R.Been riding since 2016 and went 8k miles. Now ...

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Thread: best motorcycle tires online

  1. #1
    Newbie Ryan Reiss's Avatar
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    best motorcycle tires online

    I think there's no better feeling than being on a bike.
    I ride a Kawasaki Ninja ZX10R.Been riding since 2016 and went 8k miles.
    Now it's time to replace kawasaki zx10r tires.
    The cheapest tires I found locally is $300 for a front tire and $450 for a rear tire.
    I can't pay a motorcycle tire set is over $300.
    Does anyone have any experience with buying tires online ? What’s a good site to buy motorcycle tires?
    I see Hexautoparts have tires what I need plus at good price.Are they safe ?
    Thanks in advance for any input.

  2. #2
    Rising Star MillennialNinja's Avatar
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    The main problem with buying online is installation. Depending on where you live between install and shipping the savings can get eaten up. Though it really depends. Personally, I just buy online wherever is cheapest and install the tires myself.
    - Check out my 2017 Ninja 650's Mods & Upgrades!
    - If you're looking for some new projects, I've got a few interesting motorcycle DIYs.

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    Site Elder JustAJ's Avatar
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    ironpony.com
    bikebandit.com

    If you can't do the install yourself, find a small local shop or a local cycle gear. Anything more than about $80 is a rip off (in CA anyway).

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    Newbie Ryan Reiss's Avatar
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    Thank you for your input.I am not sure why the cost in OH is more expensive than CA ? I am considering to buy it online and try to install the tires myself because I am not a rich man.
    Quote Originally Posted by JustAJ View Post
    ironpony.com
    bikebandit.com

    If you can't do the install yourself, find a small local shop or a local cycle gear. Anything more than about $80 is a rip off (in CA anyway).

  6. #5
    Newbie Ryan Reiss's Avatar
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    Yes,just as you said.It depends on many factors.How much trouble when you install tires on your bike and how long did you take ?
    Quote Originally Posted by MillennialNinja View Post
    The main problem with buying online is installation. Depending on where you live between install and shipping the savings can get eaten up. Though it really depends. Personally, I just buy online wherever is cheapest and install the tires myself.

  7. #6
    Rising Star MillennialNinja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Reiss View Post
    Yes,just as you said.It depends on many factors.How much trouble when you install tires on your bike and how long did you take ?
    The thing with tire changes is that it is half skill and half art. Everyone can learn, and it isn't that hard, but it requires a lot of tools to do right and the learning curve is steep at the beginning. Considering that you can be fairly confident I'll be changing my tires for the next few decades, it made sense for me. However if you're only thinking in the short term, then it doesn't.

    I probably spent 150-300$ in tools. When I don't need it it's just packed up in a box so it doesn't take space. I have a manual car tire changer, a motorcycle tire adapter for it, a NoMar tire changing bar, a tire balancer for cars, a tire balancer for motorcycles, and a handful of accessories like lube, balancing beads, weights, sealants, and other odd accessories.

    I'm glad I learned since it's paid for itself several times over, but I certainly didn't know what I was getting into when I started. Now I can change a tire in a few hours, including pulling out the manual tire changer and assembling it. It saves me both time and money compared to going to a shop.
    WERA689 likes this.
    - Check out my 2017 Ninja 650's Mods & Upgrades!
    - If you're looking for some new projects, I've got a few interesting motorcycle DIYs.

  8. #7
    Site Elder JustAJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Reiss View Post
    Thank you for your input.I am not sure why the cost in OH is more expensive than CA ? I am considering to buy it online and try to install the tires myself because I am not a rich man.
    It's probably related to the size of the market. SoCal is a HUGE cycling market because we don't get that cold stuff 4 months of the year!


    I have to disagree with MilennialNinja on price though. If you have a bucket, all you need to buy are three tire spoons and some cheapo water based lube. Wheel weights too but those are cheap as heck. Everything else is all about making it easier on yourself. I was doing tire changes with only the spoons and an improvised 2x4 as a bead breaker for years, and people were willing to pay me! Now I have an actual (manual) tire changer, and it's 1000x easier with that. At $90 it paid for itself after the first set of tires, and I've used it to change 3 sets on my onw current bike, 2 on my last bike, and at least 10 sets for other people at $40 a set. Some things are worth saving up and buying.

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    Supreme Being kenors's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Reiss View Post
    Thank you for your input.I am not sure why the cost in OH is more expensive than CA ? I am considering to buy it online and try to install the tires myself because I am not a rich man.
    Could very well be location. It's hugely expensive up here to get tires mounted as well. I *use* to pay $35/wheel to get tires mounted. Then the mechanic started refusing to mount mail-ordered tires. Now shops SAY it's $50/wheel. But the last set of PR4s I had mounted on the Ninja 1000 cost me $520, mounted, balanced & tax. He basically charged list price for the tires. I have a buddy with a tire mounting machine who offered his help so I bought the next set of PR4s on-line and did them myself. I gave him $20 for use of his machine. Total cost: $349. That was last year. This year it went up to $370 for the set I mounted a month ago.

    I get that dealers lease space, have lots of expensive equipment and years of training but the flip side is that for a simple common task if feels like they're gouging me. Motorcycling is expensive enough nowadays. Besides, I like doing things for myself and the payback doing your own tires feels great. 2 sets of tires would have paid for all the equipment and then some and I hope to be biking for a lot more years. It's even sweeter that a buddy of mine has the gear.

    Hint, though: Without the right equipment changing tubeless tires is a PITA. You might want to check around your area for a club/group of enthusiasts. Often at least one of them will have the right gear and is eager to help out others. Toss in $20 or a few beers and you'll probably have a friend or even a riding buddy.
    2014 Ninja w/bags, Motowerks lowered pegs, Sargent Seat, Vstream tour screen, Givi XS306 tank bag, WOLO BadBoy, Aerostitch Roadcrafter.

  10. #9
    Rising Star MillennialNinja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kenors View Post
    Hint, though: Without the right equipment changing tubeless tires is a PITA.
    This. On a dirt bike with tube tires sure you can change tires with little more than wheel spoons. But with stiff sporty tires with minimal sidewalls, I wouldn't even bother trying without some mechanical bead breaker, plus a long tire changing bar. The other factor is that it's not just about changing the tire. It's extremely easy to scratch the rim if you're not careful (and even if you are). That's why Harbor Freight's tire changer is nearly useless as is. The first time I used it, it scraped the paint right off the rim. I didn't know any better, but thankfully it was inside of the rim. I've modified mine extensively since with teflon pads to prevent any scratches.

    In other words, doing it without much regard for scratches is easy and cheap. Doing it quickly without scratching anything isn't. And the right equipment really helps with that.

    And finally, I don't know how many people leave it at changing their motorcycle tires but don't do the same with car tires. It's the same skill set, but some equipment varies (like the rim holder and tire balancing equipment). So you end up accumulating extra stuff fast.

    All in all, considering that you can't avoid changing tires on a yearly basis, and there are benefits to it, I don't regret getting the equipment at all.
    - Check out my 2017 Ninja 650's Mods & Upgrades!
    - If you're looking for some new projects, I've got a few interesting motorcycle DIYs.

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