I want to do a carb rebuild

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I want to do a carb rebuild

This is a discussion on I want to do a carb rebuild within the General ZR-7 forums, part of the Kawasaki ZR-7 category; Hi guys, I'm fresh here but I imagine I will be here for the foreseeable future. I bought a zr 7 the other day on ...

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  1. #1
    Newbie chookpoo's Avatar
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    I want to do a carb rebuild

    Hi guys,

    I'm fresh here but I imagine I will be here for the foreseeable future. I bought a zr 7 the other day on the cheap. It runs like crap and was missing at about 1500rpm. The air filter wasnt seated flush in the air box outlet and a substantial amount of crap has made its way in.

    I am very much a mechanical amateur and the most I do on my bikes are basic service and have never delved into rebuilding carbs etc.
    Is there a video tutorial or web page available with step by step advice how to do a full pull down on the carb linkage and a carb rebuild video so I can rebuild the carbs individually?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Rising Star locojim's Avatar
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    Search here and you will most likely find it..
    Carbs are a pain to remove and install plus my advice would be have someone who works on bikes do it..
    If you insist somewhere in the archives are threads I am sure..
    Start checking here.

    http://www.riderforums.com/search.ph...id=1556690&pp=

  3. #3
    Obo
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    Supreme Being Obo's Avatar
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    Even as an amateur you can certainly pull and clean the carbs yourself. A good cleaning if they are dirty will do wonders and you don't necessarily need to rejet or rebuild.

    As LocoJim says there are resources here, and related videos on the web for our model carb (also on other bikes)

    I've had my carbs out and cleaned them 4 times now and the hardest part is grating your knuckles when installing and removing the boots between the airbox and the carbs.
    2004 Kawasaki ZR-7S
    complete with extra "stuff"

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  5. #4
    Rising Star locojim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Obo View Post
    Even as an amateur you can certainly pull and clean the carbs yourself. A good cleaning if they are dirty will do wonders and you don't necessarily need to rejet or rebuild.

    As LocoJim says there are resources here, and related videos on the web for our model carb (also on other bikes)

    I've had my carbs out and cleaned them 4 times now and the hardest part is grating your knuckles when installing and removing the boots between the airbox and the carbs.
    I think I had mine off and on three times one evening.Yes those boots are a pain.

  6. #5
    Up-And Comer anilv's Avatar
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    Hi chookpoo,

    There's nothing really difficult about these bikes but you can cause damage and carbs are expensive. There is the k-tric thingy which needs a special tool to be set correctly but I just played with it in a few locations until it gave good acceleration and left it there. This thing uses an allen bolt with a spike in the middle (tamper-proofing) so you need a special tool but pliers will get it off. Replace with a normal bolt.

    Its not the worst bike to work on carbs (honda v-twins are particularly hard) but not as easy as say a single cylinder or single-carbed bike.

    Do yourself a favour and spend some money on new carb rubbers, both the ones from carb to head and from carb to airbox. Ditto for the air-filter...


    Having said that.. I would check the following first.

    1. Clean tank and get some fresh fuel in there, modern fuels go 'off' very fast. You don't want to clean the carbs and get more dirt in from a dirty tank into your nice clean carbs.

    2. Check that the petrol tap flows fuel well. This works off a vacuum from the carb. Lever down is on, lever up is reserve, lever in the middle pointing to the rear is prime. In the prime position you don't need carb vacuum.. fuel just comes out.

    3. Check the coil to plug wires and fork out some cash for new plugs. The plug caps screw on to the wires, you can unscrew them, snip a bit off the end of the wires to get some fresh metal and screw the caps back on.

    4. Is the choke lever present? There is a bar connecting all four chokes just above the rubbers which connect the carbs to the head. Pushing it in from the right side (as you sit on the bike) activates the choke. Pushing it back from the left turns it off. It is worth check to see if the choke is fully off once the engine warms up by pushing it in from the left side.

    5. A compression check would help eliminate problems with valves and worn rings. If you don't have a compression check tool run it for a while and see if all four down-pipes heat up evenly.. don't use you fingers to check.. Shut the bike down after idling/revving it for about 5 minutes. Then use a wet cloth and touch the pipes. They should 'hiss' the same and the moisture should disappear off the pipes immediately. This will ensure that all pistons are firing. A plug check will also indicate if one piston is running differently. These bikes can close up the valve clearances and result in poor running. If the compression check shows poor pressure or if one cylinder is way different than the others you may need to pull the valve cover to check the valve clearances.

    6. If it idles bad (was 1500rpm the idle?) but runs better at around 4000rpm then a clean will sort it out. But if it runs bad even at higher revs you may have engine problems.

    7. The air filter needs to be lightly oiled , otherwise it will run lean.

    8. An aftermarket pipe will affect the running of the bike unless the guy who fitted it knew what he was doing and re-jetted it to suit.

    9. Oh and while you're at it, get some fresh oil and a new filter in there. Cheap motorcycle oil will do for now.. You can buy better stuff once you get it running better.


    Hope this does not discourage you but a lot of times a poor running bike is a result of poor maintenance, not just one problem.

    All the best!

    Anilv

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